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H.Doc.108-64 PERIODIC REPORT ON THE NATIONAL EMERGENCY WITH RESPECT TO SIGNIFICANT ...


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108th Congress, 1st Session - - - - - - - - - - - - - House Document 108-63


 
  REPORT CONSISTENT WITH THE AUTHORIZATION FOR USE OF MILITARY FORCE 
                    AGAINST IRAQ RESOLUTION OF 2002

                               __________

                             COMMUNICATION

                                  from

                   THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

                              transmitting

A REPORT CONSISTENT WITH PUBLIC LAW 107-243, ``AUTHORIZATION FOR USE OF 
            MILITARY FORCE AGAINST IRAQ RESOLUTION OF 2002''

<GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT>



 April 29, 2003.--Referred to the Committee on International Relations 
                       and ordered to be printed
                                           The White House,
                                        Washington, April 14, 2003.
Hon. J. Dennis Hastert,
Speaker of the House of Representatives,
Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Speaker: Consistent with the Authorization for Use 
of Military Force Against Iraq Resolution of 2002 (Public Law 
107-243), the Authorization for the Use of Force Against Iraq 
Resolution (Public Law 102-1), and in order to keep the 
Congress fully informed, I am providing a report prepared by my 
Administration. This report includes matters relating to 
planning for post-liberation Iraq under section 7 of the Iraq 
Liberation Act of 1998 (Public Law 105-338).
            Sincerely,
                                                    George W. Bush.
                           REPORT TO CONGRESS

    Submitted consistent with Public Law 107-243: 
``Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Iraq 
Resolution of 2002'', April 14, 2003

                          I. Executive Summary

    This report covers approximately the period from February 
11, 2003 to April 1, 2003. During this period, the President 
concluded that the United States had exhausted diplomatic 
efforts to bring about the disarmament of the Iraqi regime. On 
March 18, he made available to Congress his determination in 
connection with the Authorization for Use of Military Force 
Against Iraq Resolution of 2002 (Public Law 107-243). On March 
19, after Saddam Hussein and his sons rejected a final 
opportunity to leave Iraq peacefully, the President directed 
U.S. Armed Forces, operating with other Coalition forces, to 
commence combat operations against Iraq. The President took 
this action pursuant to his authority as Commander-in-Chief and 
consistent with the Authorization for Use of Military Force 
Against Iraq Resolution (Public Law 102-1) and the 
Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Iraq Resolution 
of 2002 (Public Law 107-243) to disarm the Iraqi regime by 
force. This military action was designated ``Operation Iraqi 
Freedom'' on March 20.

                  II. Transition to Democracy Planning


                       A. IRAQI INTERIM AUTHORITY

    The President supports the establishment of an ``Iraqi 
Interim Authority'' (IIA) as quickly as practical after the 
liberation of Iraq. While the precise structure of the IIA has 
yet to be determined, certain principles with respect to its 
role and authority have been agreed upon.
    <bullet> As early as possible, we support the formation of 
an IIA, a transitional administration, run by Iraqis, until a 
permanent government is established by the people of Iraq.
    <bullet> The IIA will be broad-based and fully 
representative, with members from all of Iraq's ethnic groups, 
regions, and diaspora.
    <bullet> The IIA will be established first and foremost by 
the Iraqi people, with the help of the members of the 
Coalition, and working with the Secretary General of the United 
Nations.
    <bullet> Civilian Iraqi leaders will emerge who can be part 
of such an IIA.
    <bullet> The IIA will progressively assume more of the 
functions of government.
    <bullet> It will provide a means for Iraqis to participate 
in the economic and political reconstruction of their country 
from the outset.

                       B. FUTURE OF IRAQ PROJECT

    Background. Planning for post-Saddam Hussein Iraq has been 
ongoing for nearly a year through the State Department's Future 
of Iraq project. The project, announced in March 2002, brings 
together experts from the Iraqi exile community, free Iraqis 
living in northern Iraq, and international experts, in order to 
address practical planning issues of concern after regime 
change. Drawing on the resources of a community uniquely 
positioned to understand the underlying complexity of Iraqi 
society, the Future of Iraq project has better prepared not 
only United States Government planners, but also the Iraqi 
exiles themselves, to deal with the challenges Iraq faces after 
regime change. We expect that the Iraqi population, as it 
debates the nation's future, will be able to draw upon the work 
done by this small group which, being outside the country, has 
had the opportunity to meet and think freely about the nation's 
future.
    Recent Developments. The Future of Iraq project continues 
to hold working group meetings and to undertake immediate, 
practical post-regime change planning projects, such as 
transitional justice, public health, democratic principles, 
public finance, education, environment and water, the economy 
and infrastructure, local government, oil and energy, the role 
of the military, free press, and civil society. The results of 
the working groups have been fed into several interagency 
planning groups and made available to the Office of 
Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance (ORHA) for its 
postwar planning efforts.

                   C. ESF FUNDING OF IRAQI OPPOSITION

    Background. Economic Support Funds (ESF) have been used to 
aid opposition groups, support efforts to hold regime leaders 
accountable for their crimes, provide humanitarian relief to 
the people of Iraq, and support planning for Iraq's transition 
to democracy. These activities are all critical elements in 
laying the foundation for a free and democratic Iraq.
    Recent Developments. In February 2003, the State Department 
awarded a supplement of $7 million to the Iraqi National 
Congress to continue support for a variety of activities, 
including its newspaper and satellite TV broadcasts through 
July. The State Department has also provided roughly $2 million 
per year since FY 99 in support of war crimes investigation and 
documentation. In addition to the State Department's funding 
for war crimes investigations, the Defense Department will 
provide critical support to identify and prosecute Iraqi war 
criminals. The State Department further intends to provide up 
to $3 million in additional emergency preparedness and response 
assistance to meet the humanitarian needs of Iraqis outside the 
control of the current regime. ESF support for the ``Future of 
Iraq'' project was $5 million in FY 02 and an additional $3.5 
million is anticipated from the FY 03 appropriation.

                III. Relief and Reconstruction Planning


        A. OFFICE OF RECONSTRUCTION AND HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE

    The Office of Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance 
was established on January 20, 2003. Its mission is to plan 
for, and, in a post-hostilities environment, assist in 
administering Iraq for a limited period of time, with the 
objective of the immediate stabilization of post-war Iraq. 
Under the direction of Retired Army General Jay Garner, ORHA is 
organized around three core functions: humanitarian assistance; 
reconstruction; and civil administration. Its staff includes 
personnel from all relevant U.S. agencies and departments. 
While hostilities in Iraq have continued, ORHA staff have been 
conducting final planning and coordination in Kuwait. They have 
been working to establish lines of coordination with U.N. 
specialized agencies and other international institutions, our 
Coalition partners, bilateral donors, and nongovernmental 
organizations (NGOs). As soon as conditions permit, they will 
start their work in Iraq. Upon deployment to Iraq, ORHA's tasks 
will include assisting with humanitarian relief and 
facilitating the country's reconstruction. A key U.S. priority 
will be to assist with the reestablishment of key civilian 
services, so as to demonstrate rapid improvements in the lives 
of the Iraqi people. To the extent possible, existing Iraqi 
ministries, infrastructure and civil servants will be called on 
to perform their functions. It is anticipated that Iraqis 
currently living outside the country, bringing technical skills 
as well as experience in democratic societies, will also have 
an important role. The ultimate goal for the United States is 
to support a rapid transition of control of Iraq to the Iraqi 
people.

                    B. HUMANITARIAN RELIEF PLANNING

    Background. Decades of misallocation of resources and wars 
of aggression against its neighbors by the regime of Saddam 
Hussein have left the Iraqi population in a precarious 
humanitarian situation, inconsistent with the country's natural 
wealth and human potential. We are especially concerned that 
the remnants of the Saddam Hussein regime will continue to use 
Iraqi civilian populations as a shield for its regular and 
irregular combat forces or may attack the Iraqi population in 
an effort to undermine Coalition goals. Coalition planners have 
prepared for these contingencies, and have designed the 
military campaign to minimize civilian casualties and damage to 
civilian infrastructure. However, we recognize that the Iraqi 
population is vulnerable to humanitarian crises as a result of 
this conflict. Meeting the immediate humanitarian needs of the 
Iraqi people, particularly those displaced as a consequence of 
war, is a critical first step in assisting Iraq to build itself 
into a viable and prosperous democracy.
    Recent Developments. The United States Government is 
committed fully to providing humanitarian assistance to the 
people of Iraq--to save lives, alleviate suffering, and 
mitigate the impact of emergency situations. For the last 
several months, various United States Government agencies and 
departments have been planning for a possible humanitarian 
emergency by:
          <bullet> Assembling and training the largest-ever 
        U.S. humanitarian rapid response team;
          <bullet> Pre-positioning stockpiles of emergency 
        supplies and commodities;
          <bullet> Communicating and coordinating with U.S. and 
        international humanitarian organizations; and
          <bullet> Funding international organizations and NGO 
        preparatory efforts.
    The U.S. response will rely heavily on international and 
non-government relief professionals to deliver assistance.
    For instance, the largest Disaster Assistance Response Team 
(DART) in U.S. history--outside of an Urban Search and Rescue 
response--has been recruited. It is headquartered in Kuwait 
City and will have three mobile field offices. The DART will 
conduct assessments, direct assistance towards vulnerable 
populations, and provide funding to the 10 and NGO providers.
    The DART is comprised of more than 60 humanitarian response 
experts from various agencies and departments, including USAID; 
the State Department Bureau of Population, Refugees, and 
Migration (PRM); and the Department of Health and Human 
Services' Public Health Service.
    In addition to technical experts in areas such as health, 
food, water, and shelter, the DART has grant-making authority 
and includes administrative officers covering logistics, 
transportation, and procurement, enabling the team to function 
as a turnkey response mechanism for assessment and funding in 
the field.
    In addition, USAID has funded a significant contingency 
coordination effort for many NGOs preparing to assist in Iraq 
called the Joint NGO Emergency Preparedness Initiative, 
offering support for the latter's assessment, logistics, 
stockpiling, and staffing needs. PRM funding has been provided 
to support the contingency preparations and early response 
requirements of international humanitarian organizations.
    USAID is pre-positioning emergency supplies for the Iraqi 
people, including material in warehouses throughout the region. 
In addition to pre-positioned and in-transit food, these 
supplies include wool blankets; rolls of plastic sheeting for 
emergency shelter; personal hygiene kits; World Health 
Organization Emergency Health Kits; and water jugs, bladders, 
containers, and treatment units.
    DART areas of expertise include:
          <bullet> Health and medicines;
          <bullet> Water and sanitation;
          <bullet> Food and nutrition;
          <bullet> Shelter and supplies;
          <bullet> Internally displaced persons;
          <bullet> Humanitarian assistance infrastructure; and
          <bullet> Refugees and asylum seekers.
    USAID has allocated $154 million for Iraq humanitarian 
relief, food distribution, reconstruction, and transition 
initiatives. Of that, approximately $35 million has been spent 
to date, with $17.3 million having been spent on pre-
positioning relief supplies.
    PRM has spent an additional $36.63 million for 
prepositioning and early response requirements by international 
organizations, including $21 million to the U.N. High 
Commissioner for Refugees, $10 million to the International 
Committee of the Red Cross, $3 million to the International 
Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, and $2.63 
million to the International Organization for Migration. 
Additional funds are in the pipeline. USAID has also provided 
contributions to U.N. agencies, including $2 million to UNICEF 
for emergency health kits, and nutrition and water/sanitation 
activities; $5 million to the World Food Program for food and 
logistics measures; and $1.2 million to the U.N.'s Office for 
the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs for NGO and donor 
coordination. Support to NGOs has been provided to establish a 
consortium to conduct chemical/biological/radiological/nuclear 
training.
    On March 28, 2003, the United Nations Security Council 
unanimously passed UNSCR 1472. This resolution authorizes the 
Secretary-General to take certain steps regarding the Oil-for-
Food program to make it possible for shipments of food and 
other humanitarian goods to the Iraqi people to resume. The 
Secretary-General may spend Iraqi funds in the U.N. escrow 
account to pay: milling and delivery expenses for food that 
were formerly borne by the Iraqi regime; purchase food locally; 
reprioritize existing contracts; and place new orders for 
medicines with approval of a U.N. committee.

               C. RECONSTRUCTION PLANNING AND IRAQI DEBT

    Background. The President recognizes that after the 

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