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H.Doc.108-86 PERIODIC REPORT ON THE NATIONAL EMERGENCY WITH RESPECT TO THE WESTERN ...


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108th Congress, 1st Session - - - - - - - - - - - - - House Document 108-85


 
 A REPORT CONSISTENT WITH THE AUTHORIZATION FOR USE OF MILITARY FORCE 
                        AGAINST IRAQ RESOLUTION

                               __________

                             COMMUNICATION

                                  from

                   THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

                              transmitting

    A REPORT INCLUDING MATTERS RELATING TO POST-LIBERATION IRAQ AS 
  CONSISTENT WITH THE AUTHORIZATION FOR USE OF MILITARY FORCE AGAINST 
              IRAQ RESOLUTION OF 2002 (PUBLIC LAW 107-243)

<GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT>


 June 16, 2003.--Referred to the Committee on International Relations 
                       and ordered to be printed
                                           The White House,
                                         Washington, June 13, 2003.
Hon. J. Dennis Hastert,
Speaker of the House of Representatives,
Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Speaker: Consistent with the Authorization for Use 
of Military Force Against Iraq Resolution of 2002 (Public Law 
107-243), the Authorization for the Use of Force Against Iraq 
Resolution (Public Law 102-1), and in order to keep the 
Congress fully informed, I am providing a report prepared by my 
Administration. This report includes matters relating to post-
liberation Iraq under section 7 of the Iraq Liberation Act of 
1998 (Public Law 105-338).
            Sincerely,
                                                    George W. Bush.
                           REPORT TO CONGRESS

   Submitted Consistent With PL 107-243: ``Authorization for Use of 
    Military Force Against Iraq Resolution of 2002'', June 13, 2003

                          I. Executive Summary

    This report covers approximately the period from April 1, 
2003 to June 4, 2003. During this period, the United States-led 
Coalition removed Saddam Hussein and his regime from power, 
liberating Iraq from tyranny. The Coalition, in coordination 
with international and nongovernmental organizations, acted 
quickly to provide humanitarian relief to the Iraqi people, 
began the task of rebuilding Iraq's government, and began the 
process of rebuilding a country that had been isolated, 
oppressed and mismanaged for decades under Ba'ath rule. On May 
9, 2003, the United States, United Kingdom and Spain introduced 
a United Nations Security Council Resolution, subsequently 
adopted on May 22, to lift the sanctions burden on the Iraqi 
people, define the U.N.'s vital role in Iraq's reconstruction, 
and encourage the support of the international community.
    Relief and reconstruction efforts are summarized in section 
II. Democracy building and governance issues are described in 
section III. Military operations are covered in section IV.

                     II. Relief and Reconstruction


                      A. MISSION AND ORGANIZATION

    The American people have made a significant investment to 
liberate Iraq, and stand ready to contribute to the rebuilding 
efforts. Our policy goals for the recovery of Iraq are to:
          <bullet> Establish a secure environment for the Iraqi 
        people and the conduct of relief and recovery 
        activities;
          <bullet> Demonstrate rapid improvement in the lives 
        of the Iraqi people;
          <bullet> Maximize contributions from other countries 
        and organizations; and
          <bullet> Prepare the Iraqis for self-government.
    The Office of Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance 
(ORHA) was established on January 20, 2003. Its mission was to 
administer Iraq for a limited period of time, with the 
objective of the immediate stabilization of post-heavy combat 
Iraq. A Defense Department effort under the direction of Jay 
Garner, ORHA was organized around three core functions: 
humanitarian assistance, reconstruction, and civil 
administration. Originally, ORHA was under the operational 
control of Commander, U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM).
    On May 6, President Bush announced the appointment of 
Ambassador L. Paul Bremer III, as Presidential Envoy to Iraq. 
He reports to the President through the Secretary of Defense. 
The President authorized Ambassador Bremer to oversee, direct, 
and coordinate all United States Government (USG) programs and 
activities in Iraq, except those under the command of the 
Commander, U.S. Central Command. This responsibility includes 
overseeing the use of USG appropriations in Iraq, as well as 
Iraqi state- or regime-owned property that is properly under 
U.S. possession and made available for use in Iraq to assist 
the Iraqi people and support the recovery of Iraq.
    The Secretary of Defense appointed Ambassador Bremer as the 
Administrator of the Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA) on 
May 13, 2003. As Administrator of the CPA, Ambassador Bremer is 
responsible for the temporary governance of Iraq, and shall 
oversee, direct and coordinate all executive, legislative, and 
judicial functions necessary to carry out this responsibility, 
including humanitarian relief and reconstruction and assisting 
in the formation of an Iraqi interim administration. The 
Secretary of Defense stated in his memorandum of May 13 that 
the Commander, U.S. Central Command, acting as Commander of 
Coalition Forces, shall directly support the CPA by deterring 
hostilities; maintaining Iraq's territorial integrity and 
security; searching for, securing and destroying weapons of 
mass destruction; and assisting in carrying out U.S. policy 
generally.
    Subsequent to Ambassador Bremer's appointment as 
Administrator of the CPA, ORHA has been dissolved and the CPA 
has assumed its functions and responsibilities.
    The staff of the CPA includes personnel from all relevant 
U.S. agencies and departments, as well as representatives from 
Coalition countries. The CPA has been establishing lines of 
coordination with U.N. specialized agencies and other 
international institutions, our Coalition partners, bilateral 
donors, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs).
    The CPA's mission is to help meet Iraq's reconstruction, 
governmental, and administrative challenges, acting as the 
nucleus of Iraq's administrative apparatus; involving the Iraqi 
people in administering their own country; and maximizing 
contributions from other governments and organizations. A key 
U.S. priority has been the re-establishment of civilian public 
services to effect improvements in the lives of the Iraqi 
people. To this end, the CPA has worked closely with USCENTCOM 
to re-establish security in Iraq and to provide basic water, 
sanitation, and electric power services for the Iraqi people.
    To the extent possible, the CPA's civil administration of 
Iraq seeks to rely on existing Iraqi ministries and 
infrastructure under CPA direction. The CPA is focused on 
getting Iraqi ministries up and running. To facilitate this 
work, emergency payments have been disbursed to Iraqi civil 
servants, and actions have been taken to effect the re-
establishment of regular salary payments and schedules for all 
approved Iraqi civil servants. The ultimate goal for the United 
States will be to support a process leading to an 
internationally recognized, representative government of Iraq.
    At the same time, the CPA has initiated a program to remove 
all Iraqi officials who had been senior members of the Ba'ath 
party. This process continues, along with efforts to identify 
and train, as needed, acceptable non-Ba'athist officials to 
manage the various ministries.

                         B. HUMANITARIAN RELIEF

    The State Department's Bureau of Population, Refugees, and 
Migration (PRM) has allocated an additional $39.9 million for 
pre-positioning and for international organizations (IOs) to 
meet early response requirements, including $21 million to the 
U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), $10 million to the 
International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), $3 million to 
the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent 
Societies (IFRC), $2.63 million to the International 
Organization for Migration (IOM), and $3 million for other IOs 
and NGOs. Additional funds are in the pipeline. The U.S. Agency 
for International Development (USAID) has also provided 
contributions to U.N. agencies, including $13 million to UNICEF 
for emergency health, nutrition, and water/sanitation 
activities; $60 million to the World Food Program for food and 
logistics and $375 million worth of commodities; and $1.2 
million to the U.N.'s Office for the Coordination of 
Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) for NGO and donor coordination. 
Support to NGOs totals over $25 million for a variety of relief 
activities.
    On March 28, 2003, after substantial negotiation, the 
United Nations Security Council adopted U.N. Security Council 
Resolution 1472. This resolution, cosponsored by the United 
States in recognition of the potential humanitarian crisis in 
Iraq, extended the Oil for Food (OFF) Program for 45 days with 
certain modifications.
    On May 22, 2003, the U.N. Security Council adopted 
Resolution 1483, which, among other provisions: recognizes the 
U.S. and U.K. roles under unified (U.S.) command; notes 
specifically the CPA's role in Iraq, as described in the U.S./
U.K. letter to the President of the Security Council of May 8, 
2003; encourages international involvement in the 
reconstruction effort in Iraq; calls on States to help meet the 
humanitarian needs of Iraq, including reconstruction and 
rehabilitation of Iraq's economic infrastructure; defines the 
U.N.'s role; calls on the Secretary General to appoint a 
Special Representative for Iraq and describes the role the 
Special Representative will play; lifts sanctions and 
specifically permits the sale of oil and the deposit of sales 
proceeds into the Development Fund for Iraq, with disbursements 
from the Fund at the direction of the CPA; leaves in place 
sanctions on arms, except as they pertain to the CPA; winds 
down the Oil for Food (OFF) Program; gives the Secretary 
General an additional 6 months to ensure the delivery of 
priority civilian goods under approved contracts; provides for 
the transfer of $1 billion in unallocated funds from the OFF 
escrow account to the Development Fund for Iraq to be used for 
the benefit of the Iraqi people; provides for restoration of 
$400 million of frozen Iraqi assets that was originally used to 
capitalize the OFF program; supports formation of an Iraqi 
Interim Administration (IIA), which will be a transitional 
administration run by Iraqis until an internationally 
recognized representative government is established in Iraq and 
assumes the responsibilities of the CPA; welcomes the readiness 
of creditors, including those of the Paris Club, to seek a 
solution to Iraq's sovereign debt problems; notes establishment 
of the Development Fund for Iraq, with disbursements at the 
direction of the CPA, in consultation with the IIA, to be used 
in a transparent manner to meet the humanitarian needs of the 
Iraqi people, for the economic reconstruction and repair of 
Iraq's infrastructure, the continued disarmament of Iraq, the 
costs of Iraqi civilian administration, and for other purposes 
benefiting the people of Iraq, and with proceeds from, among 
other sources, oil sales, returned regime assets, and $1 
billion in unallocated proceeds from the OFF escrow account.
    The Development Fund for Iraq has already been established. 
On May 28, 2003, $1 billion was transferred into the account by 
the U.N. as contemplated in Resolution 1483. The Development 
Fund for Iraq will be financed from multiple Iraqi sources 
including oil revenues and blocked Iraqi assets held in foreign 
banks. We are working with the United Nations, the World Bank, 
other international organizations and governments on an 
informal preparatory meeting to discuss Iraq requirements and 
appropriate funding mechanisms.
    The U.N., other international institutions, and the United 
States and its coalition partners continue to urge all nations 
to contribute to humanitarian relief and recovery in Iraq in 
any way they can. Offers of assistance from the international 
community exceed $1.9 billion. About $700 million of this has 
been in response to the U.N. Flash Appeal to meet urgent 
requirements in Iraq. We are also discussing a formal donors 
conference this summer.

                           C. RECONSTRUCTION

    Concurrent with ongoing stability and security efforts, the 
process of rebuilding Iraq has begun in earnest. Among the 
early successes are the following:
    <bullet> Emergency payments have been made to over 
$1,500,000 Iraqi civil servants to facilitate their return to 
work and put much-needed cash into the hands of the Iraqi 
people. The funds to make these payments came from blocked 
Iraqi assets that had been vested by the United States, and 
made available for humanitarian assistance and reconstruction 
purposes in Iraq.
    <bullet> More than $300,000 has been invested in rebuilding 
and start-up costs for Iraqi ministries. More than $1,250,000 
is planned for ministry telecommunications in the near future.
    <bullet> The CPA has requested more than $12 million to 
implement a Humanitarian Mine Action plan.
    <bullet> 10,000 Iraqi police officers have returned to 
their jobs, and some of Iraq's criminal courts have resumed 
legal proceedings.
    <bullet> Several railway links with Baghdad have been 
restored, and the CPA is working to restore commercial air 
links with Baghdad and Basra. Efforts to revitalize the port of 
Umm Qasr have begun. The restoration of these vital commercial 
links and resumption of operations will benefit Iraq's economic 
recovery.
    <bullet> Iraqi primary schools reopened on May 4th, and 
secondary schools re-opened on May 10th. Preparations are being 
made to resume university instruction in time to ensure 
students are able to graduate as scheduled. Universities have 
elected new deans and other officials. USAID worked with UNICEF 
and NGOs to provide new textbooks, with apolitical content, and 
other school materials.
    <bullet> The CPA has invested more than $500,000 of vested 
assets in supplies and equipment for public services, including 
schools and hospitals. Iraqi cities have seen an improvement in 
thequality of water. Waste treatment has begun to improve, and 
electricity output is increasing to meet demand.
    <bullet> Shipments of oil and Liquid Propane Gas (LPG) are 
coming in from Kuwait and Turkey to refineries in Basra, 
Baghdad, and Bajii. We are also progressing towards bringing 
domestic fuel production up to 400,000 barrels per day to meet 
domestic demand.
    <bullet> More than 12,000 workers have already returned to 
work in the oil sector, many under interim pay arrangements 
facilitated by the Coalition.
    United States and U.K. personnel have been working to 
restore port, rail, and airport facilities throughout Iraq. 
Restoring these facilities is a key prerequisite to expanding 
Iraqi trade and economic activity. United States and U.K. 
military engineers are directing a project to dredge the 
waterway leading to the port of Umm Qasr, which will allow 
large cargo ships including those carrying humanitarian cargos 
such as grain to reach the port. Railways are being repaired 
throughout the port and major cities in Iraq. United States 
military personnel and contractors under CPA supervision are 
working to restore commercial and civilian air service at 
Baghdad International Airport, restoring the runways, taxiways, 

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