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pd01no04 Remarks in Onalaska, Wisconsin...


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when it comes into the world. There is absolutely nothing like it.
    The President. Listen, it was pretty cool to be the second person 
when I touched Barbara and Jenna. [Laughter] Go ahead. They'll be happy 
to hear I let the doc go first. [Laughter]

[Dr. Coen made further remarks.]

    The President. Thank you, doc. I appreciate you. Thank you. 
[Applause] Okay, thanks, hold on. We've got more work to do here. Thank 
you. Stay right there. Thank you all. And not only do we need 
legislation, we need something that works. Legislation that doesn't work 
is not a good deal. We're not going to do that. We need to make sure 
that there is a real cap on noneconomic damages. If you want docs to be 
in practice, we need to make sure that the reform of the medical 
liability law works. That's why I believe in firm caps to keep docs in 
business.
    Andy Kazar is with us. Andy, tell us your story. This is--just, 
again, I want people listening to understand the consequences of not 
getting a good medical liability law out of the United States Senate, a 
law that my opponent has consistently opposed. Please.

[Andy Kazar made brief remarks.]

    The President. See, this is--the story is being repeated all across 
the country. I was in Pennsylvania yesterday--ob-gyns can't practice. 
Women have to drive miles in order to find a doc. This is not the 
quality of life that we expect here in America. And it's caused by 
frivolous lawsuits. Make no mistake about it, it is a legal culture.
    When you're out rounding up the vote or if you're listening and 
trying to determine who you're for, remember the stories up here, 
remember the stories of goodhearted docs who are worried about 
practicing their skill. And remember the story about moms who are deeply 
concerned about their child. This is a big issue in this campaign.
    Now, I want to talk about a couple of other issues, and then we'll 
all go home and start working. Actually, I'm going down to Florida; 
you're going to go home and start working. [Laughter] The--and I'm not 
going down there to sit on the beach, either. [Laughter] I'm going down 
there to campaign.
    Two other--a couple of other things. I talk about time of change, 
and these are changing times. Some things don't change. The values we 
try to live by don't change, courage and compassion, reverence and 
integrity. And we stand for a culture of life in which every person 
matters and every being counts. We stand for institutions like family 
and marriage, which are the foundations of our society. And we stand for 
judges--Federal judges who know the difference between personal opinion 
and the strict interpretation of the law.
    Talking about education and health care, these are very important 
issues. But let me say to you that it all goes to naught if we don't 
secure this country, that the security of the American people is the 
most important responsibility of the President. If we show any 
uncertainty or weakness in this decade, this world of ours will drift 
toward tragedy. This isn't going to happen so long as I'm your 
President.
    Let me talk to you--I want to talk to you about some of the lessons 
that I've learned as your President after September the 11th. First of 
all, we face an enemy which has no conscience. They are coldblooded. 
Therefore, you can never hope for the best with them. You cannot 
negotiate with them. You can't say, ``Oh, well, maybe we'll sign a peace 
treaty, and therefore, they'll change their ways.'' The only way to 
secure America, to keep us safe, is to find them and bring them to 
justice before they hurt us again. And therefore, any strategy has got 
to be one that

[[Page 2540]]

is consistent, firm, and resolved and never relenting. [Applause]
    Hold on a second. Hold on for a--I've got some more I've got to tell 
you.
    Secondly, this is a different kind of war. You've got to understand, 
I wish I wasn't talking about war. No President ever wants to be the 
President of a country--of our country during war. War is horrible. But 
it's necessary to be realistic during these times. Our most solemn duty 
is to protect you, and it's a different kind of war than we're used to. 
It's a kind of war when you say something, you need to speak clearly and 
mean what you say.
    And so when I said, ``If you harbor a terrorist, you're just as 
guilty as the terrorist,'' I meant what I said. I was speaking to the 
Taliban in Afghanistan. And see, I was talking to the Taliban because 
they were providing safe haven for Al Qaida. Al Qaida was training 
there. And we said, ``Listen, get rid of Al Qaida.'' They didn't believe 
the United States of America. But because of a great military and 
because I meant what I said, Al Qaida and--the Taliban is no longer in 
control of Afghanistan and Al Qaida is on the run.
    We're making progress. Three-quarters of Al Qaida and their 
associates have been brought to justice. I assure you, we're after the 
rest of them. And the Taliban no longer is in power. And as a result of 
our action, America and the world are safer.
    But I want to tell your sons and daughters about what has taken 
place in an incredibly brief period of time. It wasn't all that long ago 
in Afghanistan that young girls were not allowed to go to school. Think 
about a society that was run by such barbarians that girls were not 
allowed to be educated. These ideologues of hate had a dark vision about 
the future. As a matter of fact, if their moms didn't toe the line, 
they'd be whipped in the public square and sometimes executed in a 
sports stadium. In defending ourselves and upholding doctrine, we 
liberated the people of Afghanistan. Twenty-five million people now live 
in freedom. Millions went to the polls to vote for their President, and 
the first voter was a 19-year-old woman.
    Three-and-a-half years ago, if you would have asked anybody whether 
or not women would be voting in Afghanistan for President, they would 
have said, ``You're crazy. You're wrong.'' And freedom is on the march. 
Darkness has turned to light in Afghanistan, and America is better off 
for it. We're better off to have an example of freedom in that part of 
the world. We're better off to have an ally in Afghanistan, an ally in 
the war on terror. And we're making progress in Iraq.
    The third lesson of September the 11th, by the way, is we've got to 
take threats seriously before they fully materialize. You can't hope--
you cannot hope for the best. It used to be, prior to September the 
11th, that if we saw a threat, we could deal with it or not deal with it 
because we didn't ever think it would come home to hurt us. That's what 
we thought. That all changed on September the 11th. You better have a 
President who fully understands that.
    My opponent in his convention speech said, ``Oh, we'll respond if 
attacked.'' That is a pre-September the 11th mindset that is dangerous 
in the world in which we live. We've got to take threats seriously 
before they come to hurt us.
    And I saw a threat in Saddam Hussein. The world is better off with 
Saddam Hussein sitting in a prison cell. [Applause] Thank you all.
    There will be Presidential elections there in January. Think how far 
that society has come from the days of mass graves and torture chambers.
    You know, I told the story one time about the seven--there's a lot 
of docs here and healers here. One of the most poignant stories of my 
Presidency was when the Oval Office door opened and in came seven men 
from Iraq, all of whom had had their right hand cut off by Saddam 
Hussein because the currency of that country had devalued and he needed 
scapegoats. It's a true story, I'm telling you. And I asked one of the 
men there, I said, ``Why you?'' He said he was a small merchant who 
needed gold to make jewelry, and he sold dinars to buy another currency 
so he could buy the gold, and it just happened to be on the day that 
Saddam was looking for a scapegoat. He found seven small merchants, 
seven individuals, hauled in, Xs carved in their foreheads, and their 
right hands cut off.

[[Page 2541]]

    They had come to see me in the Oval Office because, guess what 
happened? Great compassion existed for them when their stories were 
known. They had been to Houston, Texas, to get new hands put on. And the 
guy who did it is a guy I know, and he said, ``Would you mind welcoming 
these citizens of the world into the Oval Office,'' which I was more 
than happy to do. They came in; they were in awe of the Oval Office, of 
course. You know, I'm kind of a weeper at times; and they were weeping; 
I was semi-weeping. The guy grabs a Sharpie with his new hand and folds 
it and writes a prayer in Arabic blessing the United States of America. 
I told the guy, I told him, I said, ``Freedom is on the march in your 
country. There will be institutions greater than the people there. One 
of the great things about the American Presidency is the office is 
always greater than the person. And someday in your country, the 
institutions will be bigger than the individuals, so that no leader will 
ever be able to pluck you out of society and cut off your right hand 
again.''
    People want to be free in this world. There will be elections in 
Iraq. Listen, these enemies are trying to stop us. This guy Zarqawi, 
he's trying to stop the march of freedom. Freedom frightens these 
ideologues of hate. It is the worst thing that can happen to them. They 
can't stand the thought of free societies.
    I love to tell the story about our friend Koizumi. I'm getting kind 
of wound up here, yes. [Laughter] She wants me to--all right, hold on a 
second. I kind of felt the invisible hook, you know. [Laughter]
    I want to share this with you, though, because it's important for 
you to know my thinking about how to make this world a better place. I 
have a deep desire for your children to grow up in a peaceful world. I 
understand my duty to protect this country. I believe that liberty can 
transform societies. I believe that, and living proof of that is the 
fact that Prime Minister Koizumi is a good friend of Laura and mine. 
That probably doesn't seem much to some, but remember, it wasn't all 
that long ago, 60 years ago, that we were at war with the Japanese. The 
Japanese were the sworn enemy of the United States of America. My dad 
fought against the Japanese. I'm confident many of your relatives fought 
against the Japanese.
    And after we won the war in World War II, Harry S. Truman, President 
of the United States, and others in our country believed in the power of 
liberty to transform an enemy into an ally. There was a lot of skeptics 
then. You can understand why. ``An enemy couldn't conceivably become a 
democracy,'' some would say. ``Why do we even care about working with a 
country that had inflicted * so much harm on the citizens of this 
country?'' But there was great faith in this view. And as a result of 
that and as a result of helping Japan become a democracy, I sit down at 
the table with the Prime Minister of a former enemy, talking about how 
to keep the peace in a troubled world, talking about doing what we all 
want, and that is to extend the peace.
    * White House correction.
    Someday, an American President will be sitting down with the duly 
elected leader of Iraq talking about the peace in the Middle East, and 
our children and our grandchildren will be better off for it. [Applause]
    Hold on for a second. I have a--I believe that people want to be 
free. Freedom is not America's gift to the world; freedom is the 
Almighty God's gift to each man and woman in this world.
    In the closing days of this campaign, it's very important for you to 
remind your friends and neighbors we have--my opponent and I have a 
different vision about how to keep America secure. He talks in terms of 
a ``global test'' before we commit troops. I didn't make that up. The 
man was standing right there when he said it--well, right here to my 
right during the debate. He wasn't there physically right now. I saw a 
lot of heads turn. [Laughter]
    Listen, I work with our friends and allies. We'll continue to build 
alliances. But I will never turn over America's national security 
decisions to leaders of other countries.
    I want to thank you all for coming to greet us. I want to thank you 
for your help. I know where I want to lead this country. I know what it 
takes to continue to expand this economy so people can find work. I've 
got a vision for a health care plan that empowers patients

[[Page 2542]]

and docs. I believe in high standards in our schools, and we'll continue 
to press for educational excellence for every child. And I understand 
that the President of the United States must be consistent and firm and 
resolved in these troubling times.
    You know, when I campaigned across your State, I said if you gave 
me--in 2000--if you gave me a chance to serve, I would uphold the honor 
and the dignity of the office to which I had been elected. With your 
hard work, with your help, I will do so for 4 more years.
    God bless. And thank you all for coming.

Note: The President spoke at 2:06 p.m. at the Canton Palace Theatre. In 
his remarks, he referred to Mayor George M. McKelvey of Youngstown, OH, 
who introduced the President; Gov. Bob Taft and Lt. Gov. Jennette B. 
Bradley of Ohio; Mary Regula, wife of Congressman Ralph Regula; former 
President Saddam Hussein of Iraq; senior Al Qaida associate Abu Musab Al 
Zarqawi; and Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi of Japan. This item was 
not received in time for publication in the appropriate issue.


<DOC>
[Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents]
 [frwais.access.gpo.gov]
                         

[Page 2542]
 
Pages 2533	2688
 
Week Ending Friday, October 29, 2004
 
Memorandum on Drawdown of Commodities and Services From the Department 
of Defense To Support African Union Peacekeeping in Darfur, Sudan

October 22, 2004

 Presidential Determination No. 2005-06

Memorandum for the Secretary of State, the Secretary of Defense

Subject: Drawdown of Commodities and Services from the Department of 
Defense to Support African Union Peacekeeping in Darfur, Sudan

    Pursuant to the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States, including section 552(c)(2) of the Foreign 
Assistance Act of 1961, as amended (FAA), I hereby determine that:
 (1)         as a result of an unforeseen emergency, the provision of 
            assistance under Chapter 6 of Part II of the Act in amounts 
            in excess of funds otherwise available for such assistance 
            is important to the national interests of the United States; 
            and
 (2)         such unforeseen emergency requires the immediate provision 
            of assistance under Chapter 6 of Part II of the Act.
    I therefore direct the drawdown of up to $2,500,000 in commodities 
and services from the Department of Defense to support the 
transportation of African Union forces to Darfur, Sudan.
    The Secretary of State is authorized and directed to report this 
determination to the Congress and to publish it in the Federal Register.
                                                George W. Bush

Note: An original was not available for verification of the content of 
this memorandum. This item was not received in time for publication in 
the appropriate issue.


<DOC>
[Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents]
 [frwais.access.gpo.gov]
                         

[Page 2542-2543]
 
Pages 2533	2688
 
Week Ending Friday, October 29, 2004
 
The President's Radio Address

October 23, 2004

    Good morning. In the 3 years since September the 11th attacks, our 
Government has acted decisively to protect the homeland.
    This week, I took another important step by signing the 2005 
Homeland Security Appropriations Act. This bill provides essential 
resources for Coast Guard patrols and port security, for the Federal Air 
Marshal program, and for technology that will defend aircraft against 
missiles. With this law, we are adding new resources to patrol our 
borders and to verify the identity of foreign visitors to America. The 
new law also includes vital money for first-responders and for better 
security of chemical facilities and nuclear plants and water treatment 
plants and bridges and subways and tunnels.
    All these measures show the unwavering commitment of our Government. 
And since 2001, we have tripled overall spending for homeland security. 
We are doing everything in our power to protect the American people. 
There is more to do, and we are moving forward.
    To protect America, our country needs the best possible 

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