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<DOC>
[Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents]
 [frwais.access.gpo.gov]


[Page i-ii]
 
Monday, January 2, 1995
 
Volume 30--Number 52
Pages 2533-2540
 
Contents


[[Page i]]

Weekly Compilation of

Presidential

Documents



[[Page ii]]

Addresses and Remarks

    See also Appointments and Nominations
    Christmas greeting to the Nation--2534
    Radio address--2533
    Release of Bobby Hall by North Korea--2539

Appointments and Nominations

    Secretary of Agriculture, remarks--2535

Communications to Congress

    Cyprus, letter transmitting report--2536
    International exchange programs, letter transmitting report--2533
    Trade with the Russian Federation, letter--2538

Executive Orders

    Adjustments of Certain Rates of Pay and Allowances--2537

Interviews With the News Media

    Exchanges with reporters
        Briefing Room--2539
        Rose Garden--2535

Resignations and Retirements

    Director of Central Intelligence, statement--2536

Statements by the President

    See also Resignations and Retirements
    Attack on women's clinics in Boston, Massachusetts--2539
    Grant projects aiding the homeless--2538

Supplementary Materials

    Acts approved by the President--2540
    Checklist of White House press releases--2540
    Digest of other White House announcements--2539
    Nominations submitted to the Senate--2540
  
  

Editor's Note: Beginning with Volume 31-Number 1, January 9, 1995, a 
cumulative index to previous issues will no longer be printed in each 
issue. Indexes will be published quarterly and distributed separately.


              WEEKLY COMPILATION OF
          ------------------------------
              PRESIDENTIAL DOCUMENTS

Published every Monday by the Office of the Federal Register, National 
Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC 20408, the Weekly 
Compilation of Presidential Documents contains statements, messages, and
other Presidential materials released by the White House during the 
preceding week.

The Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents is published pursuant to
the authority contained in the Federal Register Act (49 Stat. 500, as 
amended; 44 U.S.C. Ch. 15), under regulations prescribed by the 
Administrative Committee of the Federal Register, approved by the 
President (37 FR 23607; 1 CFR Part 10).

Distribution is made only by the Superintendent of Documents, Government
Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402. The Weekly Compilation of 
Presidential Documents will be furnished by mail to domestic subscribers 
for $80.00 per year ($137.00 for mailing first class) and to foreign
subscribers for $93.75 per year, payable to the Superintendent of 
Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402. The charge 
for a single copy is $3.00 ($3.75 for foreign mailing).

There are no restrictions on the republication of material appearing in 
the Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents.


[[Page 2533]]




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[Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents]
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[Page 2533]
 
Monday, January 2, 1995
 
Volume 30--Number 52
Pages 2533-2540
 
Week Ending Friday, December 30, 1994
 
Letter to Congressional Leaders Transmitting a the Report on 
International Exchange Programs


December 20, 1994

Dear Mr. Speaker:  (Dear Mr. Chairman:)

    As required by section 229(a) of the Foreign Relations Authorization 
Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995 (Public Law 103-236), I am submitting 
the enclosed final part of my report on the extent to which federally 
funded international exchange programs share similar objectives.
    As I observed in my letter of July 28, 1994, United States 
Government educational, cultural, scientific, and professional exchange 
programs enhance communication and understanding between the United 
States and other societies. These programs are among our more effective 
tools for achieving long and intermediate range objectives of U.S. 
foreign policy.
    The initial findings of the United States Information Agency (USIA) 
review of government-wide exchange programs concerned activities with 
foreign language and area studies dimensions. This analysis focuses on 
exchanges related to the encouragement of democratic processes abroad.
    Strengthening democratic development and the intellectual 
foundations of democracy through the exchange of people and practical 
information is a vital complement to economic assistance to countries 
seeking to build democratic institutions and entrepreneurial cultures.
    Programs that share similar objectives related to support of 
democratic development abroad are sponsored primarily by the Department 
of State, the Department of Commerce, the Department of Defense, the 
Department of Justice, the Department of Labor, the Inter-American 
Foundation, the National Endowment for Democracy, the Peace Corps, the 
U.S. Agency for International Development, the U.S. Institute of Peace, 
the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and USIA. These 
programs are described in the enclosure to this letter.
    As always, my Administration will continue to work closely with the 
Congress to realize our shared goals of improving efficiency and 
reducing costs.
    Sincerely,
                                            William J. Clinton

Note: Identical letters were sent to Thomas S. Foley, Speaker of the 
House of Representatives, and Claiborne Pell, chairman of the Senate 
Committee on Foreign Relations. This item was not received in time for 
publication in the appropriate issue.


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[Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents]
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[Page 2533-2534]
 
Monday, January 2, 1995
 
Volume 30--Number 52
Pages 2533-2540
 
Week Ending Friday, December 30, 1994
 
The President's Radio Address

December 24, 1994

    Good morning; Merry Christmas; Season's Greetings. All across our 
country, families are gathering to share this joyous time and to give 
thanks for the good things in our lives.
    This holiday season, one of the greatest blessings of all is that 
our Nation is at peace, freedom is on the march, and the world is a 
safer place than it was a year ago. I'm proud of our efforts to turn 
conflict into cooperation, to transform fear into security, to replace 
hatred with hope. In a world that is ever more bound together, those 
efforts have been good for millions of people around the globe, and very 
good for America.
    Perhaps most important of all, for the first time since the dawn of 
the nuclear age, for the first time in nearly half a century, parents 
can put their children to bed at this Christmas season knowing that 
nuclear weapons from the former Soviet Union are no longer pointed at 
those children. Just this month, we signed the START I agreement with 
Russia that guarantees the elimination of thousands of missiles from the 
former Soviet arsenal and clears the way for further reduction.

[[Page 2534]]

And Belarus, Kazakhstan, and Ukraine, three republics of the former 
Soviet Union, are now fulfilling their commitments to give up every one 
of the weapons they inherited after the collapse of the Soviet Union. 
Finally, in North Korea, our firm diplomacy secured an agreement that 
requires that country first to freeze and then to dismantle its nuclear 
program, all under international inspections.
    On a separate note, let me say that our thoughts, Hillary's and 
mine, and I know all of America's, are with the family of Chief Warrant 
Officer Hilemon, who was killed last week in a tragic incident in North 
Korea. We are pleased that his remains have been returned to his family, 
and we are hopeful that his crewmate, Chief Warrant Officer Hall, will 
soon be back with his family.
    Our steady diplomacy has helped to achieve real progress on many 
fronts. But when necessary, our troops have also proved themselves ready 
to defend our national interests, to back up our commitments, and to 
promote peace and security. For 3 years, a brutal military regime 
terrorized the Haitian people and caused instability in our hemisphere. 
It wasn't until the regime knew our troops were on their way that 
finally they agreed to step down peacefully and to return power to the 
democratically elected government. Now, under President Aristide, Haiti 
is free, democratic, and more secure. Its people have a chance to 
rebuild their nation. Our hemisphere is more democratic and more stable, 
and that's good for America.
    When Iraq again threatened the stability of the Persian Gulf, I 
ordered our troops, ships, and planes to the region to stop a would-be 
aggressor in his tracks. In this vital part of the world, too, we have 
protected the peace.
    I know all Americans share my pride in the brave men and women of 
our Armed Forces who are standing watch for freedom and security today 
and in this holiday season in Haiti and the Persian Gulf and, indeed, 
all around the world. I wish all our troops could come home for the 
holidays, but those who aren't are doing important work for our Nation. 
And as you gather in your homes this week, I hope you'll join me in a 
prayer for their well-being and the health and happiness of their 
families.
    All around the world, our efforts to build peace have contributed to 
progress in solving what once seemed to be unsolvable problems. In South 
Africa, the long night of apartheid has given way to a new day of 
freedom. In Ireland, after centuries of struggle, a lasting settlement 
between Catholics and Protestants is finally within reach. And in the 
Holy Land, so close to the hearts of many of us at this time of year, 
Israelis and Arabs are turning the page on the past and embracing a 
future of peace.
    Of course, there are still too many people, from Bosnia to the 
refugee camps outside Rwanda, who are plagued by violence and cruelty 
and hatred. And we must continue our efforts to help them find peace. 
But we should remember how many people around the world are moving 
toward freedom and how fortunate we are here in America to have been 
able to help them to move toward freedom. To them, America is a beacon 
of hope. They admire our values and our strength. They see in us a 
nation that has been graced by peace and prosperity. They look to us for 
leadership and for eternal renewed energy and progress.
    For Hillary and for myself, I want to wish you and your loved ones a 
safe and happy holiday.
    God bless you all, and God bless America.

Note: The address was recorded at 1:40 p.m. on December 22 in the Map 
Room at the White House for broadcast at 10:06 a.m. on December 24.


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[Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents]
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[Page 2534-2535]
 
Monday, January 2, 1995
 
Volume 30--Number 52
Pages 2533-2540
 
Week Ending Friday, December 30, 1994
 
Christmas Greeting to the Nation

December 24, 1994

    The President. On this special day, we send our best wishes to you 
and your family, and especially to the families of our service men and 
women who are so many miles away from home this Christmas, doing 
America's work overseas, keeping the peace in the Persian Gulf, and 
bringing freedom and democracy to Haiti. We salute them as they make the 
world a safer place for all of us, for our children and for future 
generations.
    Hillary Clinton. And we thank all of you who are giving your time 
today serving others, the police and fire and medical staffs on

[[Page 2535]]

duty and all the mothers and fathers, friends and volunteers who are 

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