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pd05my03 The President's Radio Address...


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 April 30, 2003

 By the President of the United States

 of America

 A Proclamation

    To be an American is not a matter of blood or birth. Our citizens 
are bound by ideals that represent the hope of all mankind: that all men 
are created equal, endowed with unalienable rights to life, liberty, and 
the pursuit of happiness. On Loyalty Day, we reaffirm our allegiance to 
our country and resolve to uphold the vision of our Forefathers.
    Our founding principles have endured, guiding our Nation toward 
progress and prosperity and allowing the United States to be a leader 
among nations of the world. Throughout our history, honorable men and 
women have demonstrated their loyalty to America by making remarkable 
sacrifices to preserve and protect these values.
    Today, America's men and women in uniform are protecting our Nation, 
defending the peace of the world, and advancing the cause of liberty. 
The world has seen again the fine character of our Nation through our 
military as they fought to protect the innocent and liberate the 
oppressed in Operation Iraqi Freedom. We are honored by the service of 
foreign nationals in our Armed Services whose willingness to risk their 
lives for a country they cannot yet call their own is proof of the 
loyalty this country inspires. Their service and sacrifice are a 
testament to their love for America, and our soldiers' honor on and off 
the battlefield reaffirms our Nation's most deeply held beliefs: that 
every life counts, and that all humans have an unalienable right to live 
as free people.
    These values must be imparted to each new generation. Our children 
need to know that our Nation is a force for good in the world, extending 
hope and freedom to others. By learning about America's history, 
achievements, ideas, and heroes, our young citizens will come to 
understand even more why freedom is worth protecting.
    Last September, I announced several initiatives that will help 
improve students' knowledge of American history, increase their civic 
involvement, and deepen their love for our great country. The We the 
People initiative will encourage the teaching of American history and 
civic education by providing grants for curriculum development and 
training seminars. The Our Documents initiative will use the Internet to 
bring information about and the text of 100 of America's most important 
documents from the National Archives to classrooms and communities 
across the country. These initiatives are important, for it is only when 
our children have an understanding of our past that they will be able to 
lead the future.
    This Loyalty Day, as we express allegiance to our Nation and its 
founding ideals, we resolve to ensure that the blessings of liberty 
endure and extend for generations to come.
    The Congress, by Public Law 85-529, as amended, has designated May 1 
of each year as ``Loyalty Day,'' and I ask all Americans to join me in 
this day of celebration and in reaffirming our allegiance to our Nation.
    Now, Therefore, I, George W. Bush, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim May 1, 2003, as Loyalty Day. I call upon all 
the people of the United

[[Page 508]]

States to join in support of this national observance. I also call upon 
government officials to display the flag of the United States on all 
government buildings on Loyalty Day.
    In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth day 
of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand three, and of the 
Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-
seventh.
                                                George W. Bush

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 8:45 a.m., May 2, 2003]

Note: This proclamation was published in the Federal Register on May 5.


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[Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents]
 [frwais.access.gpo.gov]
                         

[Page 508-509]
 
Pages 491-529
 
Week Ending Friday, May 2, 2003
 
Proclamation 7672--National Day of Prayer, 2003

April 30, 2003

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

    We are a Nation whose people turn to prayer in times of our most 
heartfelt sorrow and our moments of greatest joy. On this National Day 
of Prayer, first called for more than 225 years ago by the Continental 
Congress, we come together to thank God for our Nation's many blessings, 
to acknowledge our need for His wisdom and grace, and to ask Him to 
continue to watch over our country in the days ahead.
    America welcomes individuals of all backgrounds and religions, and 
our citizens hold diverse beliefs. In prayer, we share the universal 
desire to speak and listen to our Maker and to seek the plans He has for 
our lives. We recognize the ways that He has blessed our land 
abundantly, and we offer thanks for these gifts and for the generosity 
of our Nation in helping those in need. We are grateful for our freedom, 
for God's love, mercy, and forgiveness, and for a hope that will never 
be shaken.
    Today, our Nation is strong and prosperous. Our Armed Forces have 
achieved great success on the battlefield, but challenges still lie 
ahead. Prayer will not make our path easy, yet prayer can give us 
strength and hope for the journey.
    As we continue to fight against terror, we ask the Almighty to 
protect all those who battle for freedom throughout the world and our 
brave men and women in uniform, and we ask Him to shield innocents from 
harm. We recognize the sacrifice of our military families and ask God to 
grant them peace and strength. We will not forget the men and women who 
have fallen in service to America and to the cause of freedom. We pray 
that their loved ones will receive God's comfort and grace.
    In this hour of history's calling, Americans are bowing humbly in 
churches, synagogues, temples, mosques, and in their own homes, in the 
presence of the Almighty. This day, I ask our Nation to join me in 
praying for the strength to meet the challenges before us, for the 
wisdom to know and do what is right, for continued determination to work 
towards making our society a more compassionate and decent place, and 
for peace in the affairs of men.
    The Congress, by Public Law 100-307, as amended, has called on our 
citizens to reaffirm the role of prayer in our society and to honor the 
religious diversity our freedom permits by recognizing annually a 
``National Day of Prayer.''
    Now, Therefore, I, George W. Bush, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim May 1, 2003, as a National Day of Prayer. I 
ask the citizens of our Nation to pray, each after his or her own faith, 
in thanksgiving for the freedoms and blessings we have received and for 
God's continued guidance and protection. I also urge all Americans to 
join in observing this day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and 
activities.
    In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth day 
of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand three, and of the 
Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-
seventh.
                                                George W. Bush

[Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 8:45 a.m., May 2, 2003]

[[Page 509]]

Note: This proclamation was published in the Federal Register on May 5.


<DOC>
[Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents]
 [frwais.access.gpo.gov]
                         

[Page 509]
 
Pages 491-529
 
Week Ending Friday, May 2, 2003
 
Message to the Senate Transmitting Amendments to the Constitution and 
Convention of the International Telecommunication Union

April 30, 2003

To the Senate of the United States:

    I transmit herewith for Senate advice and consent to ratification, 
the amendments to the Constitution and Convention of the International 
Telecommunication Union (ITU) (Geneva 1992), as amended by the 
Plenipotentiary Conference (Kyoto 1994), together with declarations and 
reservations by the United States as contained in the Final Acts of the 
Plenipotentiary Conference (Minneapolis 1998). I transmit also, for the 
information of the Senate, the report of the Department of State 
concerning these amendments.
    Prior to 1992, and as a matter of general practice, previous 
Conventions of the ITU were routinely replaced at successive 
Plenipotentiary Conferences held every 5 to 10 years. In 1992, the ITU 
adopted a permanent Constitution and Convention. The Constitution 
contains fundamental provisions on the organization and structure of the 
ITU, as well as substantive rules applicable to international 
telecommunications matters. The ITU Convention contains provisions 
concerning the functioning of the ITU and its constituent organs.
    Faced with a rapidly changing telecommunication environment, the ITU 
in 1994 adopted a few amendments to the 1992 Constitution and 
Convention. These amendments were designed to enable the ITU to respond 
effectively to new challenges posed.
    The pace at which the telecommunication market continues to evolve 
has not eased. States participating in the 1998 ITU Plenipotentiary 
Conference held in Minneapolis submitted numerous proposals to amend the 
Constitution and Convention. As discussed in the attached report of the 
Department of State concerning the amendments, key proposals included 
the following: amendments to clarify the rights and obligations of 
Member States and Sector Members; amendments to increase private sector 
participation in the ITU with the understanding that the ITU is to 
remain an intergovernmental organization; amendments to strengthen the 
finances of the ITU; and amendments to provide for alternative 
procedures for the adoption and approval of questions and 
recommendations.
    Consistent with longstanding practice in the ITU, the United States, 
in signing the 1998 amendments, made certain declarations and 
reservations. These declarations and reservations are discussed in the 
report of the Department of State, which is attached hereto.
    The 1992 Constitution and Convention and the 1994 amendments thereto 
entered into force for the United States on October 26, 1997. The 1998 
amendments to the 1992 Constitution and Convention as amended in 1994 
entered into force on January 1, 2000, for those states, which, by that 
date, had notified the Secretary General of the ITU of their approval 
thereof. As of the beginning of this year, 26 states had notified the 
Secretary General of the ITU of their approval of the 1998 amendments.
    Subject to the U.S. declarations and reservations mentioned above, I 
believe the United States should ratify the 1998 amendments to the ITU 
Constitution and Convention. They will contribute to the ITUs ability to 
adapt to a rapidly changing telecommunication environment and, in doing 
so, will serve the needs of the United States Government and U.S. 
industry.
    I recommend that the Senate give early and favorable consideration 
to these amendments and that the Senate give its advice and consent to 
ratification.
                                                George W. Bush
 The White House,
 April 30, 2003.

[[Page 510]]


<DOC>
[Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents]
 [frwais.access.gpo.gov]
                         

[Page 510]
 
Pages 491-529
 
Week Ending Friday, May 2, 2003
 
Message to the Senate Transmitting the Protocol of Amendment to the 
International Convention on the Simplification and Harmonization of 
Customs Procedures

April 30, 2003

To the Senate of the United States:

    I transmit herewith for Senate advice and consent to accession, the 
Protocol of Amendment to the International Convention on the 
Simplification and Harmonization of Customs Procedures done at Brussels 
on June 26, 1999. The Protocol amends the International Convention on 
the Simplification and Harmonization of Customs Procedures done at Kyoto 
on May 18, 1973, and replaces the Annexes to the 1973 Convention with a 
General Annex and 10 Specific Annexes (together, the ``Amended 
Convention''). I am also transmitting, for the information of the 
Senate, the report of the Department of State on the Amended Convention.
    The Amended Convention seeks to meet the needs of international 
trade and customs services through the simplification and harmonization 
of customs procedures. It responds to modernization in business and 
administrative methods and techniques and to the growth of international 
trade, without compromising standards of customs control. Accession by 
the United States would further the U.S. interest in reducing non-tariff 
barriers to international trade.
    By acceding to the Protocol, a state consents to be bound by the 
amended 1973 Convention and the new General Annex. At the same time, or 
anytime thereafter, Parties have the option of accepting any of the 
Specific Annexes (or Chapters thereof), and may at that time enter 
reservations with respect to any Recommended Practices contained in the 
Specific Annexes. In accordance with these terms, I propose that the 
United States accept seven of the Specific Annexes in their entirety and 
all the Chapters, but one of each of two other Specific Annexes (A-E, G, 
and H, as well as Chapters 1, 2, and 3 of F, and Chapters 1, 3, 4, and 5 
of J), and enter the reservations proposed by the Bureau of Customs and 
Border Protection as set forth in the enclosure to the report of the 
Department of State. The provisions for which reservation is recommended 
conflict with current U.S. legislation or regulations. With these 
proposed reservations, no new implementing legislation is necessary in 
order to comply with the Amended Convention.
    Accession to the Protocol by the United States would contribute to 
important U.S. interests. First, accession by the United States would 
benefit the United States and U.S. businesses by facilitating greater 
economic growth, increasing foreign investment, and stimulating U.S. 
exports through more predictable, standard, and harmonized customs 
procedures governing cross-border trade transactions. Setting forth 
standardized and simplified methods for conducting customs business is 
important for U.S. trade interests in light of the demands of increased 
trade flows, as is the use of modernized technology and techniques for 
customs facilitation. These achievements can best be pursued by the 
United States as a Party to the Amended Convention. Second, through 
early accession, the United States can continue to take a leadership 
role in the areas of customs and international trade facilitation as the 
U.S. accession would encourage other nations, particularly developing 
nations, to accede as well.
    I recommend that the Senate give early and favorable consideration 
to the Protocol and give its advice and consent to accession.
                                                George W. Bush
 The White House,
 April 30, 2003.


<DOC>

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