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<DOC>
[Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents]
 [frwais.access.gpo.gov]


[Page i-ii]
 
Monday, January 9, 1995
 
Volume 31--Number 1
Pages 1-30
 
Contents

[[Page i]]

Weekly Compilation of

Presidential

Documents



[[Page ii]]

  


Addresses and Remarks

    See also Appointments and Nominations
    Arkansas
        Arrival in Little Rock--2
        Elementary students, question-and-answer session in Sherwood--13
        William J. Clinton Elementary Magnet School dedication in 
            Sherwood--17
    Discussions with congressional leaders--20, 23
    Radio address--1

Appointments and Nominations

    Acting Director of Central Intelligence, statement--24
    District of Columbia Superior Court, judges--20
    White House Office, Assistant to the President and Press Secretary, 
        remarks--20

Communications to Congress

    Agenda for the 104th Congress, letter--22
    Bulgaria, letter on trade--3
    Haiti, message transmitting report--8
    Iraq, letter reporting on compliance with UNSC resolutions--3
    Israel, letter transmitting loan guarantees report--8

Communications to Federal Agencies

    Cuba, memorandum on migrant assistance--9
    Haiti, memorandum on migrant assistance--9
    Newly Independent States of the Former Soviet Union, memorandum on 
        refugee assistance--8

Interviews With the News Media

    Exchanges with reporters
        Briefing Room--20
        Cabinet Room--20
        Cotton Plant, AR--9
        Scott, AR--10

Statements by the President

    See also Appointments and Nominations
    Abortion clinics, violence prevention--3
    Bosnia, cessation of hostilities--2

Supplementary Materials

    Acts approved by the President--30
    Checklist of White House press releases--30
    Digest of other White House announcements--24
    Nominations submitted to the Senate--25
  
  

Editor's Note: Beginning with this issue, a cumulative index to previous 
issues will no longer be printed each week. Indexes will be published 
quarterly and distributed separately.

    An annual index to 1994 issues is being printed under separate cover 
and distributed separately.



              WEEKLY COMPILATION OF
          ------------------------------
              PRESIDENTIAL DOCUMENTS

Published every Monday by the Office of the Federal Register, National 
Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC 20408, the Weekly 
Compilation of Presidential Documents contains statements, messages, and
other Presidential materials released by the White House during the 
preceding week.

The Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents is published pursuant to
the authority contained in the Federal Register Act (49 Stat. 500, as 
amended; 44 U.S.C. Ch. 15), under regulations prescribed by the 
Administrative Committee of the Federal Register, approved by the 
President (37 FR 23607; 1 CFR Part 10).

Distribution is made only by the Superintendent of Documents, Government
Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402. The Weekly Compilation of 
Presidential Documents will be furnished by mail to domestic subscribers 
for $80.00 per year ($137.00 for mailing first class) and to foreign
subscribers for $93.75 per year, payable to the Superintendent of 
Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402. The charge 
for a single copy is $3.00 ($3.75 for foreign mailing).

There are no restrictions on the republication of material appearing in 
the Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents.





[[Page 1]]




<DOC>
[Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents]
 [frwais.access.gpo.gov]


[Page 1-2]
 
Monday, January 9, 1995
 
Volume 31--Number 1
Pages 1-30
 
Week Ending Friday, January 6, 1995
 
The President's Radio Address


December 31, 1994

    Good morning. The celebration of the New Year is an occasion for 
optimism and hope; it's full of dreams for the years ahead. At the same 
time, it's important that we take last year's lessons with us into the 
future, which is exactly why we make New Year's resolutions. They're an 
avowal to work even harder in the coming year to be the best we can be.
    New Year's is also a very good time to think about what we want for 
America, as well as for our own families in the year ahead, and about 
what each of us can do to make our great Nation the best that it can be.
    My New Year's resolution to all of you is simple: I'm going to keep 
doing the work we have begun to help Americans compete and win in the 
new global economy and to restore the American dream for middle class 
families.
    First and foremost, we should do nothing to jeopardize the economic 
recovery we have helped to create over the last 2 years. Our deficit 
reduction plan has already cut our deficit by $700 billion. That's over 
$10,000 of debt for every American family. The economic strategy we have 
pursued, reducing the deficit, expanding trade, investing in the 
education and training of our people in the technologies of the future, 
this strategy has helped to produce over 5 million new jobs in the last 
2 years and, in 1994, more high-wage jobs than in the previous 5 years 
combined.
    We're cutting the Federal bureaucracy by over 272,000 people to its 
smallest size in 30 years. And with these cuts in Government, we've used 
the savings to invest in the American people, to expand Head Start, to 
make college loans more affordable to 20 million Americans, and already 
giving a tax cut to over 15 million working families with incomes under 
$27,000 a year.
    But last year made it very clear that all the good statistics in the 
world don't necessarily mean more money in the pockets of working 
Americans or more security and peace of mind for them. Most Americans 
haven't had a pay increase in this recovery. Most Americans are working 
longer work weeks than they were 10 years ago. Over a million Americans 
in working families lost their health insurance in 1994. And as other 
costs go up, disposable income and job security go down. So the average 
American is simply not receiving enough benefit from this robust 
economic recovery. And we have to keep working until we change that.
    Two weeks ago, I proposed a middle class bill of rights, four new 
ideas to help middle class Americans build a future that lives up to 
their dreams.
    First, to help Americans get the skills and education they need to 
get and keep high-paying jobs, I proposed that college tuition, 
community college costs, costs for graduate school, professional school, 
vocational education, or worker training be fully deductible from your 
taxable income, phased up to $10,000 a year if your family makes less 
than $120,000 a year. Second, to better support working families raising 
children, if your family makes $75,000 a year or less, I propose a tax 
cut phased up to $500 for every child under 13. Third, if your family 
makes less than $100,000 a year, I propose allowing you to put $2,000 a 
year tax-free into an Individual Retirement Account, but also to enable 
you to withdraw the money tax-free for education, for buying a first 
home, for paying for health care expenses, or for the care of an elderly 
parent. Finally, I want to take the billions of dollars that Government 
now spends on job-training programs of all kinds and make that money 
directly available to working Americans, to spend as you decide when you 
need to learn new skills to get a new job or a better job.

[[Page 2]]

    As we do this, we must not go back to the irresponsible practices of 
the past, back to trickle-down economics and exploding the deficit. 
Every single penny of the middle class bill of rights that I propose is 
paid for by dramatic cuts in the Government, which I have proposed. An 
important part of my New Year's resolution is this: I won't allow anyone 
to destroy the progress we have made in reducing the deficit.
    On this New Year's Eve, I want to welcome the new Congress. I ask 
them to put aside partisan differences, as I pledge to do, and join me 
in a New Year's resolution to do everything we can to help Americans 
prosper; to reduce yesterday's Government but help Government stay on 
the side of American families; to give the middle class tax relief but 
to do it responsibly, without exploding the deficit; to keep investing 
in education and job training; and to make our tax relief targeted 
toward the future, toward raising children, educating and training 
people, toward the things which make America great.
    I want to close by asking all of you to join me as well. Nothing we 
do here will succeed unless each of you takes a personal responsibility 
first to develop your own capacity and those of your family members and 
then to rekindle a sense of community and common purpose in America. We 
are not enemies in this country. We are all in this together. We are 
going up or down together. With all of our diversity and differences, 
unless we work together, we can never make America the best it can be. 
So let's all make a New Year's resolution to face the future challenges 
together so that we can realize together the opportunities that lie 
ahead.
    Tomorrow, as you visit with your friends and your family, I hope 
you'll talk about the ideas in the middle class bill of rights. In the 
coming weeks, when you're back at work or when you're on the phone with 
friends, I hope you'll talk about the future and about the future you 
want for your families and your country. And I hope you'll do a lot of 
listening to each other and arguing with each other, but don't forget 
for a moment that we have more in common than what divides us. This is 
the great source of our abiding strength.
    Hillary and I wish you and your family a very happy New Year. Please 
be careful tonight, and thanks for listening.

Note: The address was recorded at 10:55 a.m. on December 28 in the 
Roosevelt Room at the White House for broadcast at 10:06 a.m. on 
December 31.


<DOC>
[Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents]
 [frwais.access.gpo.gov]


[Page 2]
 
Monday, January 9, 1995
 
Volume 31--Number 1
Pages 1-30
 
Week Ending Friday, January 6, 1995
 
Statement on the Cessation of Hostilities in Bosnia

December 31, 1994

    I welcome the agreement of the parties for a 4-month cessation of 
hostilities in Bosnia.
    We hope it will be respected fully and pave the way for a negotiated 
settlement that brings peace to all the long-suffering people of Bosnia.
    We applaud the flexibility that the parties have shown and commend 
the United Nations and former President Carter for their efforts.
    We will be working with our Contact Group partners, the United 
Nations, and the parties in a renewed effort to seize this opportunity 
for peace.


<DOC>
[Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents]
 [frwais.access.gpo.gov]


[Page 2]
 
Monday, January 9, 1995
 
Volume 31--Number 1
Pages 1-30
 
Week Ending Friday, January 6, 1995
 
Remarks on Arrival in Little Rock, Arkansas

January 2, 1995

    Hello. I want to thank you so much for coming out to see us. It's 
wonderful to be home. We're looking forward just to spending some 
personal time visiting with our friends, saying hello to people, driving 
around the State a little bit. And I'm even going to have a few hours 
tomorrow where I have nothing on the schedule, for the first time in 

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