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<DOC>
[Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents]
 [frwais.access.gpo.gov]


[Page i-iii]
 
Monday, March 16, 1998
 
Volume 34--Number 11
Pages 389-437
 
Contents

[[Page i]]

Weekly Compilation of

Presidential

Documents



[[Page ii]]


Addresses and Remarks

    American Medical Association National Leadership Conference--391
    Connecticut
        Democratic Business Council luncheon in Westport--401
        Housatonic Community-Technical College in Bridgeport--396
    Democratic National Committee dinner--424
    International Women's Day--410
    National Association of Attorneys General--416
    Ohio, Democratic Business Council dinner in Cincinnati--404
    Quality Interagency Coordination Task Force establishment, 
        memorandum signing--428
    Radio address--390
    Representative-Elect Lois Capps, telephone remarks--414
    Senator Ernest Hollings, dinner honoring--422
    White House Millennium Lecture with Stephen Hawking--389

Communications to Congress

    Alaska's mineral resources, message transmitting report--403
    Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against 
        Women, letter--414
    Federal agency climate change programs and activities, message 
        transmitting report--404
    Vietnam, message transmitting most-favored-nation status waiver--407

Communications to Federal Agencies

    Child care, memorandum on steps to improve federally sponsored--400
    Jordan, memorandum on military drawdown--434
    Quality Interagency Coordination Task Force establishment, 
        memorandum--429
    Vietnam, memorandums on most-favored-nation status--407
    Women and girls, memorandum on steps to combat violence against 
        women and trafficking in--412

Executive Orders

    Further Amendment to Executive Order 13010, Critical Infrastructure 
        Protection--403
    Increasing Employment of Adults With Disabilities--431

Interviews With the News Media

    Exchanges with reporters in the Oval Office--407, 426

Letters and Messages

    Saint Patrick's Day, message--420

Meetings With Foreign Leaders

    Thailand, Prime Minister Chuan--426
    United Nations, Secretary-General Annan--407
  
(Continued on the inside of the back cover.)
  

Editor's Note: The Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents is also 
available on the Internet on the GPO Access service at http://
www.gpo.gov/nara/nara003.html.



              WEEKLY COMPILATION OF
          ------------------------------
              PRESIDENTIAL DOCUMENTS

Published every Monday by the Office of the Federal Register, National 
Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC 20408, the Weekly 
Compilation of Presidential Documents contains statements, messages, and
other Presidential materials released by the White House during the 
preceding week.

The Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents is published pursuant to
the authority contained in the Federal Register Act (49 Stat. 500, as 
amended; 44 U.S.C. Ch. 15), under regulations prescribed by the 
Administrative Committee of the Federal Register, approved by the 
President (37 FR 23607; 1 CFR Part 10).

Distribution is made only by the Superintendent of Documents, Government
Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402. The Weekly Compilation of 
Presidential Documents will be furnished by mail to domestic subscribers 
for $80.00 per year ($137.00 for mailing first class) and to foreign
subscribers for $93.75 per year, payable to the Superintendent of 
Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402. The charge 
for a single copy is $3.00 ($3.75 for foreign mailing).

There are no restrictions on the republication of material appearing in 
the Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents.






[[Page iii]]

Contents--Continued

Proclamations

    Greek Independence Day: A National Day of Celebration of Greek and 
        American Democracy--422
    National Poison Prevention Week--421

Statements by the President

    Death of James B. McDougal--391
    House of Representatives action on the ``African Growth and 
        Opportunity Act''--416

Statements by the President--Continued

    Representative Jospeh P. Kennedy II, decision not to seek 
        reelection--431

Supplementary Materials

    Acts approved by the President--436
    Checklist of White House press releases--436
    Digest of other White House announcements--434
    Nominations submitted to the Senate--435

[[Page 389]]




<DOC>
[Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents]
 [frwais.access.gpo.gov]


[Page 389-390]
 
Monday, March 16, 1998
 
Volume 34--Number 11
Pages 389-437
 
Week Ending Friday, March 13, 1998
 
Remarks at the White House Millennium Lecture With Stephen Hawking


March 6, 1998

    The President. Thank you very much. And Dr. Hawking, you'll have to 
forgive me, I'm a little hoarse. I hope for some genetic improvement 
sometime in the next year or so. [Laughter]
    Ladies and gentlemen, this was a stunning event for me and, I hope, 
for all of you. Yesterday Stephen and Elaine came by the White House to 
see Hillary and me and, as you can imagine, like Hillary, I had reread 
``A Brief History of Time,'' and I was utterly terrified--[laughter]--
that he would say something like, you know, ``I went to University 
College Oxford, too,'' and then he would ask me some incredible 
comparative academic question about our experiences there. Instead, he 
said, ``Was the food just as bad when you were there?''--[laughter]--
which was a wonderful relief. [Laughter]
    Albert Einstein once said, because politics is for the present, but 
an equation is something for eternity, equations were more important 
than politics. I don't know about the politics part, but Professor 
Hawking's insights into equations have altered our notions of time and 
the very nature of eternity itself. Tonight he's given us a lot to think 
about, even the ability to imagine a future in which we as humans will 
have finally captured the ``Holy Grail of physics,'' reconciling the 
infinitesimal with the infinite, presenting the world with the ultimate 
theory of everything. Now, when a physicist does that, he can totally 
ignore politics and buy a newspaper. [Laughter]
    The one thing I liked most about thinking about the future in 
Professor Hawking's term is that even when we reach the era of ``Star 
Trek,'' which will make a lot of our children very happy, it won't be so 
static. It will still be human and dynamic. And according to the visuals 
accompanying the lecture, it will still matter whether you can bluff at 
poker, which is encouraging. [Laughter]
    I want to get on with the questions now. And again, I want to thank 
Professor Hawking for the extraordinary clarity and vigor of his 
presentation and for sharing his time with us tonight, and for placing 
this particular moment in the larger spectrum of time--which I think if 
we all could do more and more clearly every day, we would live happier, 
more productive lives.
    Thank you, Professor.
    Ellen, would you like to take over and bring in the questions?

[At this point, the question-and-answer part of the lecture proceeded.]

    The President. Dr. Hawking, our position is we have repealed that 
law. [Laughter]
    Let me say, first of all, in defense of my Vice President, you will 
all understand that he would love to be here, but there is a peculiar 
gravitational force in New Hampshire that manifests itself with a 
remarkable regularity. [Laughter] Let me also say that in the visual 
presentation accompanying Dr. Hawking's lecture, there was that 
remarkable project stamped ``canceled'' on it. This administration 
opposed the cancellation of it, I'm proud to say. [Laughter] But we hope 
that the Swiss project will take up the slack.
    There's so many questions I know you would all like to ask. We have 
hundreds of questions coming in, and one of the questions I wish there 
were time to explore is, if we do, in fact, acquire a general 
understanding that time and space are more multidimensional than we had 
imagined, and computers become ever more sophisticated, even if people 
will never be able to travel at the speed of light, will we be able to 
communicate some day in some ways that destroy our common notions of 
time?
    I've thought about it a lot, and I'm not smart enough to know what 
the answer is,

[[Page 390]]

but I'd love to--that's one of the reasons I enjoyed re-reading the 
book.
    Let me also say one other thing to close--since our Nobel laureate 
talked about his faith about how the world began--the First Lady started 
tonight by talking about the marvels of technology which enable this 
astonishing man to communicate with us. And it is true that he is here, 
and we did this because of the marvels of technology. It is also true, 
in my mind, that he is a genuine living miracle because of the power of 
the heart and the spirit. And we can only hope that all the advances 
that he has foreseen for us tonight in human knowledge will serve to 
amplify the heart and the spirit that we have humbly witnessed this 
evening.
    Thank you, and God bless you all.

Note: The President spoke at 8:17 p.m. in the East Room at the White 
House. In his remarks, he referred to Elaine Hawking, wife of Stephen W. 
Hawking, Lucasian professor of mathematics at Cambridge University, who 
gave the second lecture in the Millennium series; Ellen Lovell, 
Director, White House Millennium Council; and William D. Phillips, 1997 
Nobel laureate in physics. The President also referred to the canceled 
superconducting super collider project. Professor Hawking, who suffers 
from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, 
spoke with the aid of a computerized voice synthesizer. This item was 
not received in time for publication in the appropriate issue.


<DOC>
[Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents]
 [frwais.access.gpo.gov]


[Page 390-391]
 
Monday, March 16, 1998
 
Volume 34--Number 11
Pages 389-437
 
Week Ending Friday, March 13, 1998
 
The President's Radio Address

March 7, 1998

    Good morning. Since I took office I've done everything in my power 
to protect our children from harm. We've worked to make their streets 
and their schools safer, to give them something positive to do after 
school and before their parents get home. We've worked to teach our 
children that drugs are dangerous, illegal, and wrong. This week we took 
a major step to protect our children, indeed all Americans, from the 
dangers of drunk driving by proposing bipartisan legislation to lower 
the legal limit to .08 in every State.
    Today I want to talk to you about the historic opportunity we now 
have to protect our Nation's children from an even more deadly threat: 
smoking. Smoking kills more people every day than AIDS, alcohol, car 
accidents, murders, suicides, drugs, and fires combined. Nearly 90 
percent of those smokers lit their first cigarette before they turned 
18.
    Today, the epidemic of teen smoking is raging throughout our Nation 
as, one by one, our children are lured by multimillion dollar marketing 
schemes designed to do exactly that. Consider this: 3,000 children start 
to smoke every day illegally, and 1,000 of them will die sooner because 
of it. This is a national tragedy that every American should be honor-

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