Home > 2001 Presidential Documents > pd24se01 Proclamation 7469--National POW/MIA Recognition Day, 2001...

pd24se01 Proclamation 7469--National POW/MIA Recognition Day, 2001...


Google
 
Web GovRecords.org

peace. They represent evil and war.
    When we think of Islam, we think of a faith that brings comfort to a 
billion people around the world. Billions of people find comfort and 
solace and peace. And that's made brothers and sisters out of every 
race--out of every race.
    America counts millions of Muslims amongst our citizens, and Muslims 
make an incredibly valuable contribution to our country. Muslims are 
doctors, lawyers, law professors, members of the military, 
entrepreneurs, shopkeepers, moms and dads. And they need to be treated 
with respect. In our anger and emotion, our fellow Americans must treat 
each other with respect.
    Women who cover their heads in this country must feel comfortable 
going outside their homes. Moms who wear cover must not be intimidated 
in America. That's not the America I know. That's not the America I 
value.

[[Page 1328]]

    I've been told that some fear to leave; some don't want to go 
shopping for their families; some don't want to go about their ordinary 
daily routines because, by wearing cover, they're afraid they'll be 
intimidated. That should not and that will not stand in America.
    Those who feel like they can intimidate our fellow citizens to take 
out their anger don't represent the best of America. They represent the 
worst of humankind, and they should be ashamed of that kind of behavior.
    This is a great country. It's a great country because we share the 
same values of respect and dignity and human worth. And it is my honor 
to be meeting with leaders who feel just the same way I do. They're 
outraged; they're sad. They love America just as much as I do.
    I want to thank you all for giving me a chance to come by. And may 
God bless us all. Thank you.

Note: The President spoke at 3:12 p.m. at the mosque.


<DOC>
[Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents]
 [frwais.access.gpo.gov]
                         

[Page 1328-1329]
 
Pages 1319-1355
 
Week Ending Friday, September 21, 2001
 
Proclamation 7465--National Farm and Ranch Safety and Health Week, 2001

 September 17, 2001

 By the President of the United States

 of America

 A Proclamation

    Our Nation's agriculture industry represents 13 percent of our 
economy and remains central to our prosperity at home and our 
competitiveness abroad. At the core of this industry are countless 
dedicated farmers and ranchers working to produce food stuffs at a level 
of efficiency and quality unrivaled around the globe. In many ways, 
agriculture ranks among the most crucial of our Nation's industries; and 
yet, its reliability and productivity are often taken for granted.
    Our farmers and ranchers face significant challenges and 
uncertainty, from inclement weather to damaging insects. They also face 
health and safety dangers, from exposure to chemicals and the operation 
of machinery to tending livestock. In 1999, the agriculture industry 
suffered more than 770 deaths and 150,000 disabling injuries. Of these 
victims, many were children and young people injured or killed in 
preventable farm and ranch accidents.
    Progress is being made in developing technology that makes farm and 
ranch work safer. Safety equipment features for tractors, such as roll-
over protective structures, bypass starter covers, and hazard warning 
lights, aid in the prevention of injuries and save lives. Sunscreens, 
hearing protection devices, and other personal protective equipment 
reduce the serious health problems caused by toxic gases, chemicals, and 
harsh environmental conditions. We must increase awareness of the 
availability of safety and health protection measures. I encourage 
farmers and ranchers to develop safety and health plans that meet the 
needs of their businesses, families, and employees. Safety equipment 
should be installed, maintained regularly, and used consistently. 
Children also must be taught to recognize risks on the farm and ranch 
and to help with chores safely.
    Despite many hazards and uncertainties, America's farmers and 
ranchers remain among the most dedicated and productive contributors to 
our Nation's economy. I am committed to supporting the American farmer 
and rancher, and my Administration will help those facing financial 
difficulties caused by storms, droughts, or any other unforseen natural 
catastrophe. In times of emergency, farmers and ranchers will get the 
assistance they need, when they need it. I recently signed a $5.5 
billion agriculture supplemental bill that affirms my commitment to 
maintaining a strong and healthy agricultural economy.
    My Administration also will support tax-deferred savings accounts to 
help farming and ranching families guard against downturns. To keep 
farms and ranches in a family from generation to generation, we are 
eliminating the death tax. Finally, farmers and ranchers need foreign 
markets to sell their products, and I will work hard to ensure that 
agriculture is a top priority in future trade negotiations.
    Our Nation owes a debt of gratitude to our farmers and ranchers for 
helping to ensure stability in our economy, for providing

[[Page 1329]]

food products that amply meet all our citizens' needs, and for 
representing what is best about America. They show the character and 
values that have made this country strong, values of love and family, 
faith in God, and respect for nature. We honor them by encouraging safe 
farming and ranching practices that improve and protect the lives of all 
farmers and ranchers.
    Now, Therefore I, George W. Bush, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim the week of September 16 
through September 22, 2001, as National Farm and Ranch Safety and Health 
Week. I call upon agriculture-related agencies, organizations, and 
businesses to strengthen their commitment to provide quality safety and 
health training to farmers, ranchers, and their families. I also call 
upon citizens to recognize the sacrifice and dedication of those 
individuals and communities whose work in agriculture provides the 
quality food that we enjoy.
    In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this seventeenth day 
of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of the 
Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-
sixth.
                                                George W. Bush

 [Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12:17 p.m., September 
18, 2001]

Note: This proclamation was published in the Federal Register on 
September 19.


<DOC>
[Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents]
 [frwais.access.gpo.gov]
                         

[Page 1329-1330]
 
Pages 1319-1355
 
Week Ending Friday, September 21, 2001
 
Proclamation 7466--Citizenship Day and Constitution Week, 2001

September 17, 2001

By the President of the United States

of America

A Proclamation

    As the delegates to the 1787 Constitutional Convention in 
Philadelphia began working on what would become the United States 
Constitution, they grasped that a great democracy must be built on the 
twin foundations of national consent to a Federal Government and respect 
for individual rights. After more than two centuries of continual 
cultural, legal, and economic change, our unique experiment in self-
government has borne successful witness to the prescient genius and 
timeless wisdom of our Founding Fathers. Throughout America's history, 
in times of turmoil and peace, liberty and oppression, our faith in the 
Constitution's promise of freedom and democracy has been a steadfast 
rock of national stability against the raging seas of political change. 
Today, in the face of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, we 
must call upon, more than ever, the Constitutional principles that make 
our country great.
    In creating our Nation's Constitutional framework, the Convention's 
delegates recognized the dangers inherent in concentrating too much 
power in one person, branch, or institution. They wisely crafted a 
Government that balanced the functions and authority of a Federal system 
among three separate but equal branches: the Executive, the Legislative, 
and the Judicial. As a further check on central power, the Framers 
granted citizens the right to vote, giving them the power to express 
their political preferences peacefully and thereby to effect change in 
the Government.
    The Convention delegates ratified the Constitution on September 17, 
1787, and submitted it to the States for approval. After much 
deliberation and discussion at the State level, the following two 
concerns emerged from among those who feared the Constitution's proposed 
centralization of Federal power: (1) the threat of tyranny; and (2) the 
loss of local control. To address these fears, our Founders amended the 
Constitution by adding a Bill of Rights. These ten amendments provided a 
series of clear limits on Federal power and a litany of protective 
rights to citizens. This development underscored the important and 
enduring Constitutional principle of enumerated powers, and it set our 
national course on a route that would eventually enhance and expand 
individual rights and liberties.
    Today, our Nation celebrates not only the longest-lived written 
Constitution in world history, but also the enduring commitment

[[Page 1330]]

of our forebears who upheld the Constitution's core principles through 
the travails of American history. They pursued a more perfect Union as 
abolitionists, as suffragists, or as civil rights activists, 
successfully seeking Constitutional amendments that have strengthened 
the protections provided to all Americans under law. In so doing, they 
rendered the moral resolve of our Nation stronger and clearer.
    Our Republic would surely founder but for the faith and confidence 
that we collectively place in our Constitution. And it could not prosper 
without our diligent commitment to upholding the Constitution's original 
words and implementing its founding principles. From the noble efforts 
of public servants to the civic acts of local people, our continuous 
Constitutional engagement has proved to be an exceptional feature of our 
Nation's prosperous development.
    To continue this legacy, each of us must recognize that we bear a 
solemn responsibility to promote the ideals of freedom and opportunity 
throughout our land. We each should serve our Nation by actively 
supporting and shaping our Government's institutions, by working 
together to build strong communities, and by loving our neighbors. Doing 
this will ensure that the American dream will become real for every 
willing citizen; and, in fulfilling this call together, we will honor 
the spirit of our powerful and enduring Constitution.
    The Congress, by joint resolution of February 29, 1952 (36 U.S.C. 
106), designated September 17 as ``Citizenship Day,'' and by joint 
resolution of August 2, 1956 (36 U.S.C. 108), requested that the 
President proclaim the week beginning September 17 and ending September 
23 of each year as ``Constitution Week.''
    Now, Therefore, I, George W. Bush, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim September 17, 2001, as 
Citizenship Day and September 17 through September 23, 2001, as 
Constitution Week. I encourage Federal, State, and local officials, as 
well as leaders of civic, social, and educational organizations, to 
conduct ceremonies and programs that celebrate our Constitution and 
reaffirm our commitment as citizens of our great Nation.
    In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this seventeenth day 
of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of the 
Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-
sixth.
                                                George W. Bush

 [Filed with the Office of the Federal Register, 12:17 p.m., September 
18, 2001]

Note: This proclamation was published in the Federal Register on 
September 19.


<DOC>
[Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents]
 [frwais.access.gpo.gov]
                         

[Page 1330-1331]
 
Pages 1319-1355
 
Week Ending Friday, September 21, 2001
 
Proclamation 7467--Minority Enterprise Development Week, 2001

 September 17, 2001

 By the President of the United States

 of America

 A Proclamation

    More than three million minority business owners across the United 
States are helping to build a stronger America. These hardworking men 
and women contribute everyday to the economic development of their 
communities by creating jobs and other opportunities for their 
neighbors. Minority business entrepreneurs represent the best of the 
American spirit, in their determination to overcome obstacles and in 
their striving for better lives for themselves and for their families.
    My Administration encourages the growth and success of minority 
businesses across the United States by giving them the tools to succeed. 
The recent passage of the largest tax cut in nearly two decades is just 
one of those tools. We also slashed the bottom Federal income tax rate 
from 15 percent to 10 percent and thereby put more money into the hands 
of consumers and entrepreneurs. We are eliminating the death tax that 
has been such a heavy burden on our minority business owners. And I 
signed into law, Public Law 107-16, the ``Economic Growth and Tax 
Reconciliation Act of 2001,'' that will increase lower income groups' 
access to the middle class, promote equal opportunity, and encourage 
entrepreneurship.

[[Page 1331]]

    One important way that we can encourage entrepreneurial growth in 
the minority-owned business community is to open up new markets abroad 
for American products. If Congress gives me trade promotion authority 
(TPA), I will have the negotiating power to knock down the trade 
barriers that prevent American goods from entering some markets around 
the world. The growth and expanded opportunities that TPA would bring 
will mean jobs for many working people and more opportunities for 
minority-owned businesses.
    As we celebrate the achievements of our Nation's minority 
entrepreneurs during Minority Enterprise Development Week, we also 
affirm our commitment to the principle of equal opportunity. My 
Administration is working hard to achieve an historic reform in our 
education system that will significantly improve our schools and make 
sure that no child is left behind. My agenda also supports effective job 
training for all Americans to ensure that the American dream touches 
every willing heart. In so doing, we will enhance our Nation's strength 
and productivity, while creating more vibrant communities and improved 
standards of living for every citizen.

Pages: << Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Next >>

Other Popular 2001 Presidential Documents Documents:

1 pd24se01 Proclamation 7469--National POW/MIA Recognition Day, 2001...
2 pd16jy01 Remarks on Medicare Reform...
3 pd24de01 Acts Approved by the President...
4 pd29ja01 Memorandum on Restoration of the Mexico City Policy...
5 pd16ap01 Remarks in a Discussion on Character-Building Programs in Education...
6 pd10de01 Contents...
7 pd21my01 Notice--Continuation of Emergency With Respect to Burma...
8 pd05mr01 Exchange With Reporters During a Tour of Control Concepts Corporation in...
9 pd30ap01 Letter to Congressional Leaders Reporting on the National Emergency With...
10 pd04jn01 Executive Order 13215--President's Information Technology Advisory...
11 pd20au01 Remarks to the Hispano Chamber of Commerce in Albuquerque...
12 pd07my01 Remarks at the White House Correspondents' Association Dinner...
13 pd03se01 Remarks on Induction Into the Little League Hall of Excellence in South...
14 pd08ja01 Memorandum on Keeping the Heating Fuel Distribution System Open...
15 pd09jy01 Memorandum on a United States Contribution to the Korean Peninsula...
16 pd15ja01 Statement on the Family and Medical Leave Act...
17 pd28my01 Commencement Address at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut...
18 pd22oc01 Message to the Congress Transmitting the Proposed ``Freedom to Manage...
19 pd13au01 Statement on the Death of Maureen Reagan...
20 pd05fe01 Remarks in a Meeting With Catholic Charities...
21 pd23jy01 Remarks on Presenting the Congressional Medal of Honor...
22 pd30jy01 Statement on Signing the Supplemental Appropriations Act, FY 2001...
23 pd29oc01 Message to the Congress Transmitting a Report of the Railroad Retirement...
24 pd19fe01 Remarks to State Department Employees...
25 pd08oc01 Nominations Submitted to the Senate...
26 pd18jn01 Exchange With Reporters Prior to the Plenary Session of the United...
27 pd26no01 Remarks on the Dedication of the Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice...
28 pd12mr01 Contents...
29 pd10se01 Joint Statement Between the United States of America and the United...
30 pd12no01 Satellite Remarks to the Central European Counterterrorism Conference...


Other Documents:

2001 Presidential Documents Records and Documents

GovRecords.org presents information on various agencies of the United States Government. Even though all information is believed to be credible and accurate, no guarantees are made on the complete accuracy of our government records archive. Care should be taken to verify the information presented by responsible parties. Please see our reference page for congressional, presidential, and judicial branch contact information. GovRecords.org values visitor privacy. Please see the privacy page for more information.
House Rules:

104th House Rules
105th House Rules
106th House Rules

Congressional Bills:

104th Congressional Bills
105th Congressional Bills
106th Congressional Bills
107th Congressional Bills
108th Congressional Bills

Supreme Court Decisions

Supreme Court Decisions

Additional

1995 Privacy Act Documents
1997 Privacy Act Documents
1994 Unified Agenda
2004 Unified Agenda

Congressional Documents:

104th Congressional Documents
105th Congressional Documents
106th Congressional Documents
107th Congressional Documents
108th Congressional Documents

Congressional Directory:

105th Congressional Directory
106th Congressional Directory
107th Congressional Directory
108th Congressional Directory

Public Laws:

104th Congressional Public Laws
105th Congressional Public Laws
106th Congressional Public Laws
107th Congressional Public Laws
108th Congressional Public Laws

Presidential Records

1994 Presidential Documents
1995 Presidential Documents
1996 Presidential Documents
1997 Presidential Documents
1998 Presidential Documents
1999 Presidential Documents
2000 Presidential Documents
2001 Presidential Documents
2002 Presidential Documents
2003 Presidential Documents
2004 Presidential Documents

Home Executive Judicial Legislative Additional Reference About Privacy