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pd28my01 Commencement Address at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut...


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<DOC>
[Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents]
 [frwais.access.gpo.gov]
                         

[Page i]
 
Monday, May 28, 2001

[[Page i]]

Weekly Compilation of

Presidential

Documents



<DOC>
[Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents]
 [frwais.access.gpo.gov]
                         

[Page i-ii]
 
Pages 777-813
 
 Contents

[[Page ii]]


 Addresses and Remarks

    Connecticut, commencement address at Yale University in New Haven--
        784
    Cuban Independence Day--777
    Hispanic faith-based organizations, leaders--788
    Hispanic Scholarship Fund--786
    Indiana, commencement address at the University of Notre Dame in 
        Notre Dame--779
    Maryland, commencement address at the U.S. Naval Academy in 
        Annapolis--804
    Military reenlistment ceremony--797
    Ohio, St. Augustine Parish community in Cleveland--798
    Radio address--778
    Republican National Committee gala--791

 Bill Signings

    Animal Disease Risk Assessment, Prevention, and Control Act of 2001, 
        statement--804

 Communications to Congress

    Bosnia and Herzegovina, message transmitting report on achieving 
        benchmarks for a sustainable peace process--809
    Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro), the Bosnian 
        Serbs, and Kosovo, messages on the national emergency--802, 804
    Sierra Leone, message on action prohibiting the importation of rough 
        diamonds--795
    U.S. Trade and Investment Policy Toward Sub-Saharan Africa and 
        Implementation of the African Growth and Opportunity Act, 
        message transmitting report--784

 Executive Orders

    Additional Measures With Respect to Prohibiting the Importation of 
        Rough Diamonds From Sierra Leone--794

Letters and Messages

    National Missing Children's Day, message--809

Notices

    Continuation of Emergency With Respect to the Federal Republic of 
        Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro) the Bosnian Serbs, and 
        Kosovo--801

Proclamations

    National Hurricane Awareness Week--790
    National Maritime Day--783
    Prayer For Peace, Memorial Day--808

Statements by the President

    See also Bill Signings
    Andrei Sakharov, 80th anniversary of birth--786
    House of Representatives action on education reform legislation--798

Supplementary Materials

     Acts approved by the President--813
     Checklist of White House press releases--812
     Digest of other White House announcements--809
     Nominations submitted to the Senate--811

  

  Editor's Note: The President was at Camp David, MD, on May 25, the 
closing date of this issue. Releases and announcements issued by the 
Office of the Press Secretary but not received in time for inclusion in 
this issue will be printed next week.


              WEEKLY COMPILATION OF
          ------------------------------
              PRESIDENTIAL DOCUMENTS

Published every Monday by the Office of the Federal Register, National 
Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC 20408, the Weekly 
Compilation of Presidential Documents contains statements, messages, and
other Presidential materials released by the White House during the 
preceding week.

The Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents is published pursuant to
the authority contained in the Federal Register Act (49 Stat. 500, as 
amended; 44 U.S.C. Ch. 15), under regulations prescribed by the 
Administrative Committee of the Federal Register, approved by the 
President (37 FR 23607; 1 CFR Part 10).

Distribution is made only by the Superintendent of Documents, Government
Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402. The Weekly Compilation of 
Presidential Documents will be furnished by mail to domestic subscribers 
for $80.00 per year ($137.00 for mailing first class) and to foreign
subscribers for $93.75 per year, payable to the Superintendent of 
Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402. The charge 
for a single copy is $3.00 ($3.75 for foreign mailing).

There are no restrictions on the republication of material appearing in 
the Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents.



[[Page 777]]




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[Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents]
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[Page 777-778]
 
Pages 777-813
 
Week Ending Friday, May 25, 2001
 
Remarks in Recognition of Cuban Independence Day


May 18, 2001

    Sientese. [Laughter] Bienvenidos a la casa de todos que--quien viven 
en este grande pais. Welcome to the White House.
    Mr. Secretary, you were an easy pick. [Laughter] There's no question 
you do a fabulous job on behalf of America. Thank you for taking the 
assignment.
    Another member of my team who is here who helps us have a strong and 
certain foreign policy is Senorita Condoleezza Arroz. [Laughter] That 
means ``Rice.'' [Laughter]
    Senator Graham, thank you for being here. We're honored by your 
presence. I know you're a strong friend of Cuba's. And of course, to--
and it's great that Ileana and Lincoln are with us, as well. Thank you.
    I noticed when Gloria sang the Cuban anthem, that the first two 
people on their feet were the two Congresspeople from south Florida. And 
Lincoln, I did notice that you were braced at attention, too, I might 
add--proud. So it's great to have you all here.
    Gloria, thank you very much. Sorry you brought your husband--no. 
[Laughter] We love Emilio. He's a good man. And Gloria, thank you for 
coming and bringing tu ninita. Thank you all for being here. We love 
your music. Your husband has been such a good friend of me and my 
family, and so have you.
    The great poet--man, you must be a strong person with a beautiful 
heart and a wonderful, artistic touch. Angel, welcome to the White 
House. And Lizebet, thank you for coming. I don't think many in America 
know your story, that you were picked up on a raft, and you played the 
national anthem on your violin when you were picked up. That's 
beautiful.
    And finally--por fin, ``la Voz''--[laughter]--Jon Secada. Thank you, 
Jon, for being here. I appreciate you very much. Glad you're here.
    It's a great honor for me to welcome you all to the White House to 
celebrate May 20th, Cuban Independence Day. It's a day when we honor the 
warm family ties, the faith, the history, and heritage that unite our 
two peoples.
    As Angel and Lizebet and so many others remind us, it is a day when 
we pay thanks to the magnificent contributions of Cubans to our national 
life. They enrich every field, from science to industry to the arts, 
including my favorite performing art--baseball. [Laughter] But mostly, 
today is a day when we reflect on the greatnesses of Cuba's far-too-
distant past and the brightness of its future, of how, together, we can 
hasten that future's arrival.
    Just last month I returned from the Summit of the Americas in Quebec 
City. Thirty-four democratic nations committed ourselves to building a 
hemisphere of freedom. But one nation was not there, because that nation 
has a leader who has no place at the democratic table. Indeed, his 
nation is not free, but enslaved. He is the last holdout of the 
hemisphere, and time is not on his side.
    The Cuban independence we celebrate today was the product of the 
enormous courage of the Cuban people and the statesmanship of leaders 
such as Jose Marti. The tyranny that rules Cuba today stands as an 
insult to their sacrifices. But we're confident in one fact: Cuban 
courage is more powerful and enduring than Castro's legacy and tyranny.
    Our Nation has an economic embargo against Castro's regime. But 
today, of all days, it is important for us to remember that our goal is 
not to have an embargo against Cuba; it is freedom in Cuba.
    The United States welcomes the opportunity to trade with Cuba when 
there are entrepreneurs who are free to trade with us. We welcome the 
opportunity to build diplomatic relations with Cuba when the Cuban 
Government is a democracy, when the Cuban people can be free from fear 
to say

[[Page 778]]

what they think and choose who shall govern them.
    The sanctions our Government enforces against the Castro regime are 
not just a policy tool; they're a moral statement. My administration 
will oppose any attempt to weaken sanctions against Cuba's Government 
until the regime--and I will fight such attempts until this regime frees 
its political prisoners, holds democratic, free elections, and allows 
for free speech.
    The policy of our Government is not merely to isolate Castro but to 
actively support those working to bring about democratic change in Cuba. 
And that is why we will support legislation like the ``Cuban Solidarity 
Act'' and the ``Cuban Internal Opposition Assistance Act.'' History 
tells us that forcing change upon repressive regimes requires patience. 
But history also proves, from Poland to South Africa, that patience and 
courage and resolve can eventually cause oppressive governments to fear 
and then to fall.
    One of the surest ways to foster freedom is to give people unlimited 
access to unbiased information. The strongest walls of oppression can't 
stand when the floodgates of modern telecommunications are opened. We 
must explore ways to expand access to the Internet for the average Cuban 
citizen. And we must strengthen the voices of Radio and TV Marti, with 
strong leadership. And we will strengthen those voices with strong 
leadership and new direction.
    Today I say this to Mr. Castro: If you are confident your ideas are 
right, then stop jamming the broadcasts of those whose ideas are 
different. And until you do, we will look for ways to use new 
technology, from new locations to counter your silencing of the voices 
of liberty.
    Last month the U.N. Human Rights Commission called on Castro's 
regime to respect the basic human rights of all its people. The United 
States leadership was responsible for passage of that resolution. Some 
say we paid a heavy price for it. But let me be clear: I'm very proud of 
what we did. And repressed people around the world must know this about 
the United States: We might not sit on some Commission, but we will 
always be the world's leader in support of human rights.
    Today, all our citizens are proud to stand with all Cubans and all 
Cuban-Americans who love freedom. We will continue to stand with you 
until that day, hopefully not in the too-distant future, when all Cubans 
breathe the heady air of liberty.
    We are proud to stand with those Cubans who, today, enrich our 
Nation with their energies and industry. We're proud to stand with the 
farmers and workers of Cuba who dream of liberty's blessings. We are 
proud to stand, too, with those who are suffering and dying in jails 
because they had the courage to speak the truth.
    Y aqui en este Casa Blanca, estamos felices de cultivar ``una rosa 
blanca en Julio como en Enero.'' Y por fin, viva Cuba libre.
    Thank you all.

Note: The President spoke at 3:30 p.m. in the East Room at the White 
House. In his remarks, he referred to Secretary of Housing and Urban 
Development Mel R. Martinez; Representatives Ileana Ros-Lehtinen and 
Lincoln Diaz-Balart; entertainers Gloria and Emilio Estefan; poet Angel 
Cuadra; musician Lizebet Martinez; singer Jon Secada; and President 
Fidel Castro of Cuba. This item was not received in time for publication 
in the appropriate issue.


<DOC>
[Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents]
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[Page 778-779]
 
Pages 777-813
 
Week Ending Friday, May 25, 2001
 
The President's Radio Address

May 19, 2001

    Good morning. This week I outlined a new energy strategy for our 
Nation--more than 100 specific recommendations to promote energy 
conservation, enlarge and diversify our energy supply, and modernize the 
networks that link energy producers to energy consumers.
    We need to act to protect family budgets. Since 1998, the energy 
bill of the average family has skyrocketed by 25 percent. That's a 
hardship for every family. We need to act to prevent more and more 
widespread blackouts. Blackouts disrupt businesses and put public health 
and safety at risk. We need to act to reduce our reliance on foreign 
crude oil. And if we fail to act, our environment will suffer, as 

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