Home > 107th Congressional Documents > S.Doc.107-3 AUTHORITY AND RULES OF SENATE COMMITTEES, 2001-2002 ...

S.Doc.107-3 AUTHORITY AND RULES OF SENATE COMMITTEES, 2001-2002 ...


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             rights and protection of the environment. For this 
             Californian the quest for high public office--even the 
             United States Senate--was never a simple pursuit of power 
             nor an end in itself.
               Politics and policy were the means by which he could 
             help make the human passage on earth fairer, safer and 
             more serene. His commitment to halting future use of 
             nuclear weapons began when he was introduced to Albert 
             Einstein in 1946. He was still working tirelessly toward 
             that goal when he died, at age 86, eight years after he 
             left the Senate.
               In the shorthand of the obituary writer, Cranston is 
             remembered for winning four Senate elections, serving 
             seven consecutive terms as Democratic Whip, for having run 
             for president as the champion of a nuclear freeze and for 
             being tarred by the so-called Keating Five scandal. While 
             all true, that doesn't begin to describe a political 
             career of amazing productivity and accomplishment, showing 
             just how much one person quietly can do to shape his or 
             her times.
               By one count, there were 2,500 tallies in the Senate 
             between 1969 and 1989 that were decided by fewer than five 
             votes, and often by a single vote. Cranston was often a 
             crucial player, not only for his vote alone but as a 
             behind-the-scene strategist, head counter, marshaler of 
             forces and shrewd compromiser who always lived to fight 
             another day.
               He was frequently one-half of various Senate odd-couple 
             pairings, meshing his principles with pragmatism. He 
             teamed with conservative Senators such as Strom Thurmond 
             (R-S.C.) to improve veterans programs, Alfonse D'Amato (R-
             N.Y.) on public housing measures and the legendary Barry 
             Goldwater (R-Ariz.) to protect press freedoms guaranteed 
             under the First Amendment.
               Cranston was liberal and an idealist to the core, but 
             never an ideologue or blindly partisan. That balance 
             enabled him to become one of the most durable and 
             successful California politicians of the 20th century. He 
             was elected six times to statewide office from California.
               Representing the West Coast mega-State in the Senate 
             meant skillfully balancing myriad insistent and often 
             conflicting home-State interests. Even as California 
             changed politically and demographically, Cranston managed 
             to steer a delicate course between the State's giant 
             agribusiness interests and those of consumers, family 
             farmers and farm workers; he weighed the claims of home 
             builders and growing communities against the need to 
             preserve open spaces and wildlife habitats.
               Amazingly, he helped end the Vietnam War and was a major 
             figure in the nation's arms control and peace movements, 
             even as he effectively represented the epicenter of the 
             nation's defense and aerospace industries.
               It is a measure of the man that he was able to separate 
             the warriors of Vietnam from the war itself. From 1969 to 
             1992 all legislation concerning America's veterans bore 
             his stamp, especially measures improving health care and 
             mental health services for those who fought in the 
             nation's most unpopular war.
               Teaming up with the late Representative Phillip Burton 
             (D) of San Francisco on environmental issues, the two 
             Californians managed to place under Federal protection as 
             much acreage as all the national park lands created 
             earlier in the 20th century combined.
               Today there is a catalog of thousands of bills and 
             amendments he personally authored affecting virtually 
             every aspect of national life: civil rights, adoption and 
             foster care reform, wild rivers, research to improve aging 
             and longevity, workplace safety, emergency medical 
             services and much more.
               He lived by the maxim that a leader can accomplish great 
             things if he doesn't mind who gets the credit.
               The Cranston style has not been much in evidence in 
             Washington during recent years. However, Members in the 
             107th Congress--where many a cause will be determined by 
             one or very few votes--would do well to consider the 
             lessons of his enobling career. If they study the Cranston 
             legacy and seek to emulate it, the Nation and the world 
             will be better for it.

               Mr. KENNEDY. Mr. President, Kim, Colette, Evan, R.E.--
             let me begin by saying I loved Alan too. I will never 
             forget the 24 years of friendship and leadership and 
             achievement with which he graced the Senate and the 
             Nation. So it's a special privilege and honor for me to be 
             part of this tribute today. Alan is profoundly missed by 
             his family and friends, his colleagues in the Congress, 
             and by all those around the world who pursue the great 
             goals of hope and progress and peace.
               I must say, I grew up thinking Cranston was a city in 
             Rhode Island. But Alan taught each of us that Cranston 
             stands for something else as well, the very best in public 
             service.
               Alan loved to lead behind the scenes; for 14 of those 24 
             Senate years with us, he was our Democratic Whip, and he 
             wrote the book about the job. In those great years, we 
             used to tease Alan about the position, because so few 
             people outside Congress knew what it involved. Since Alan 
             was from California, a lot of people thought the Minority 
             Whip was the name of a leather bar in Malibu.
               But seriously, Alan was a giant of his day on many 
             issues, and his concern for social justice made him a 
             leader on them all. We served together for many years on 
             the Labor Committee and especially the Health 
             Subcommittee, and his insights were indispensable. I 
             always felt that if we'd had another Alan Cranston or two 
             in those years, we'd have actually passed our Health 
             Security Act, and made health care the basic right for all 
             that it ought to be, instead of just an expensive 
             privilege for the few.
               Perhaps the greatest legacy that Alan left us was his 
             able and tireless work for democracy and world peace. 
             Every village in the world is closer to that goal today 
             because of Alan. No one in the Senate fought harder or 
             more effectively for our nuclear weapons freeze in the 
             1980s, or for nuclear arms control. His hope for a 
             nuclear-free future still represents the highest 
             aspiration of millions, even billions, throughout the 
             world.
               I also recall Alan's pioneering efforts to press for 
             Senate action to end the war in Vietnam, and his equally 
             able leadership for civil rights at home and human rights 
             around the world. We know how deeply he felt about 
             injustice to anyone anywhere. His leadership in the battle 
             against apartheid in South Africa was indispensable.
               Throughout his brilliant career, the causes of civil 
             rights and human rights were central to Alan's being and 
             his mission--and America and the world are better off 
             today because Alan Cranston passed this way.
               A key part of all his achievements was his unique 
             ability to translate his ideals into practical 
             legislation. Few if any Senators have been as skilled as 
             Alan in the art of constructive legislative compromise 
             that fairly leads to progress for the Nation.
               He was a vigorous supporter of the Peace Corps, a strong 
             overseer of its performance, and a brilliant advocate for 
             all the Peace Corps volunteers. He was a champion for 
             health coverage of returning volunteers, and one of the 
             first to understand that good health coverage had to 
             include mental health services too.
               In many ways, his first love was the Peace Corps, and I 
             know that President Kennedy would have been very proud of 
             him. Even before he came to the Senate, he had his first 
             contact with the Corps, as a consultant for Sargent 
             Shriver. As Alan often said, he became involved because he 
             was so inspired by my brother's vision of a world where 
             Americans of all ages could work side by side with peoples 
             throughout the world to put an end to poverty.
               Because of Alan, the Peace Corps today is thriving as 
             never before--free of the partisan tensions that divide us 
             on other issues, spreading international understanding of 
             Alan's and America's best ideals, educating new 
             generations of young Americans about our common heritage 
             as travelers on Spaceship Earth, teaching us about the 
             beauty, the richness, and the diversity of other peoples, 
             other languages, and other cultures and about the enduring 
             importance of the greatest pursuit of all, the pursuit of 
             peace.
               Near the end of John Bunyan's ``Pilgrim's Progress,'' 
             there is a passage that tells of the death of Valiant:

               Then, he said, I am going to my Father's. And though 
             with great difficulty I am got hither, yet now I do not 
             regret me of all the trouble I have been at to arrive 
             where I am. My sword I give to him that shall succeed me 
             in my pilgrimage, and my courage and skill to him that can 
             get it. My marks and scars I carry with me, to be a 
             witness for me, that I have fought his battle who now will 
             be my rewarder.
               When the day that he must go hence was come, many 
             accompanied him to the riverside, into which as he went, 
             he said, `Death, where is thy sting?' and as he went down 
             deeper, he said, `Grave, where is thy victory?' So he 
             passed over, and all the trumpets sounded for him on the 
             other side.

               We loved you, Alan. We miss you. And we always will.

               Mr. KERRY. Mr. President, it is a special privilege to 
             join all of you today to honor the life and extraordinary 
             accomplishments of Alan Cranston.
               As we all know, Alan was a sprinter and--always with an 
             incredible mischievous twinkle in his eye he sprinted 
             through life. I think one of the most enduring images of 
             him is of Alan on the eve of the Iowa caucuses in 1984 at 
             the Holiday Inn in Keokuk, Iowa, sprinting barefooted down 
             the 40-meter hallway, walking back and repeating the 
             exercise for about 40 minutes. It was no coincidence that 
             Alan's favorite hotel in the country, Chicago's O'Hare 
             Hilton, boasts 250-meter hallways.
               Three weeks ago in California we shared a goodbye to our 
             friend, this sprinter, at a memorial service--calling to 
             mind the many ways he enriched public lives and personal 
             relationships.
               There in the Grace Cathedral, we heard Colette Cranston 
             say that in death Alan Cranston ``has become my Jiminy 
             Cricket--that little voice in her conscience that says, 
             `Colette, think before you leap.' '' It would not be an 
             exaggeration to say that warning was characteristic of 
             Alan when he served here in the U.S. Senate. He wanted us 
             to look, and he wanted us to leap. He implored us to put a 
             human face on public policy--to think not in statistics 
             and numbers and programs alone, but in terms of people; 
             and the people he spoke of most often were senior 
             citizens, children, those without decent housing, 
             immigrants, and those in need of a helping hand regardless 
             of race or religion. He was a moral voice, a voice of 
             conscience, someone who understood that even as he 
             remained vigilant defending the needs of the homefront in 
             California, he was also a global citizen who knew this 
             institution had global responsibilities.
               Through four terms as a U.S. Senator, he remained a man 
             of enormous humility; on his answering machine he was 
             simply ``Alan''--as he was to so many who knew him. This 
             personal sense of place and restraint made it easy to 
             underestimate the contributions he made to the Senate, and 
             to our country. Certainly he never paused long enough to 
             personally remind us of the impact of his service, of the 
             history he was a part of and the lives he touched.
               I first met Alan in 1971 when I had returned from 
             Vietnam and many of our veterans were part of an effort to 
             end a failed American policy in Vietnam. In Alan Cranston 
             we found one of the few Senators willing not just to join 
             in the public opposition to the war in Vietnam, but to 
             become a voice of healing for the veterans of the war, a 
             statesman whose leadership enabled others, over time, to 
             separate their feelings for the war from their feelings 
             for the veterans of the war. At a time when too many 
             wanted to disown its veterans, Alan offered Vietnam 
             veterans a warm embrace. He was eager to do something all 
             too rare in Washington: listen--and he listened to 
             veterans who had much to say, much of it ignored for too 
             long. He honored their pride and their pain with 
             sensitivity and understanding.
               That's when I first saw the great energy and commitment 
             Alan brought to the issues affecting veterans, especially 
             those of the Vietnam era. He was deeply involved in 
             veterans health care issues, among the first to fight for 
             recognition of post-Vietnam stress syndrome, and a leader 
             in insisting on coverage under the VA for its treatment. 
             When the agent orange issue came to the fore, Alan 
             insisted on getting answers from an unresponsive 
             government about the consequences of exposure to dioxin, 
             making sure that veterans and their families got the 
             health care they needed. Under his leadership Congress 
             grudgingly increased GI bill benefits for Vietnam 
             veterans--veterans who too often had to fight for benefits 
             they should have been guaranteed without question--indeed, 
             for veterans who had to fight if only to have a memorial 
             and if only to have the government recognize that they 
             fought in a war and not a police conflict. Alan's 
             leadership made all the difference. It is a sad truth in 
             our country's history that a weary Nation seemed eager to 
             turn its back on so many Vietnam veterans who simply 
             sought their due; it should forever be a source of pride 
             to the Cranston family that Alan was chief among those who 
             insisted that America honor that service and keep faith 
             with sons who left pieces of themselves and years of their 
             lives on the battlefield in that far-away nation.
               This was a man who fought with the greatest of passion 
             for those who had fought in a difficult war--even as he 
             was also the Senator who fought against all that war 
             represents--remembering that war, brutality, and killing 
             are the ultimate failure of diplomacy.
               Alan Cranston was above all a man of peace. With him it 
             was not just a policy but a passion. Remember: This was a 
             man who, in 1934, found himself in the same room as Adolf 
             Hitler. Five years later, he wrote a critical English 
             translation of Adolf Hitler's ``Mein Kampf'' in an effort 
             to reveal the German leader's true plans. He wore Hitler's 
             ensuing lawsuit as a badge of honor, proud that he had 
             stood up to try and warn the English-speaking world about 
             the evils of nazism.
               Throughout the rest of his service he used public office 
             to force Americans to listen to other prescient warnings--
             about nuclear arms, about a dangerous arms race spiraling 
             beyond our control, and about hopes for peace that he 
             refused to give up even as others chose to beat the drums 
             for war.
               Senator Cranston came to his famous commitment to arms 
             control after meeting with Albert Einstein in 1946. He 
             left that meeting convinced that the threat of atomic 
             weapons had to be stemmed--and he spent the balance of his 
             life arguing that conviction before the Nation.
               As a member of the Senate leadership and a senior voice 
             on the Democratic side of the Foreign Relations Committee 
             he worked to reduce the nuclear threat. One of his most 
             important efforts was one of the least publicized. 
             Throughout the 1970s and the 1980s, Alan convened a unique 
             arms control study group, the ``SALT Study Group.'' This 
             Senators-only gathering met monthly in his office, off the 
             record, and face to face to define common ground. He knew 
             the impact quiet diplomacy could have on the issues he 
             cared about most of all.
               He loved what the Peace Corps does, and he fought for 
             it. He fought to attach human rights conditions on aid to 
             El Salvador and to halt contra aid. He was a leading 
             national advocate for a mutual verifiable nuclear freeze. 
             He was always an idealist whose increase in political 
             power was always met by progress for the issues he cared 
             about so deeply. It was not just the work of a career, but 

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