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ua14no94 DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (TREAS)...


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Meeting Notice a58 FR 65683n of Comment Period to 02/21/94     12/16/93
NPRM Comment Period End                                        12/20/93
Final Rule; Arri59 FR 40186and Lightering Equipment            08/05/94
SNPRM; Operational Measures                                    03/00/95
SNPRM; Structural Measures                                     09/00/95
Small Entities Affected:


None


Government Levels Affected:


None


Analysis:


 Regulatory Evaluation; Environmental Impact


Additional Information:


This entry was previously titled Existing Tank Vessel Hull 
Requirements. The correct docket number is 91-045. The rulemaking 
project has been divided into three distinct parts: A final rule was 
published that requires an advance notice of arrival for all tank 
vessels 5,000 GT or more entering U.S. ports and the carriage of 
lightering equipment on these vessels. A supplemental notice of 
proposed rulemaking will be issued for Structural Measures and an SNPRM 
will be issued for Operational Measures.


Agency Contact:
R. Crenwelge
Project Manager
G-MS
Department of Transportation
U.S. Coast Guard
2100 Second Street SW.
Washington, DC 20593-0001
202 267-6220
RIN: 2115-AE01
_______________________________________________________________________
DOT--Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)
            ___________________________________________________________
PROPOSED RULE STAGE
            ___________________________________________________________
122. +CORROSION CONTROL PROGRAM
Legal Authority:


 49 USC 1352 to 1355; 49 USC 1401; 49 USC 1421 to 1431; 49 USC 1471; 49 
USC 1472; 49 USC 1501; 49 USC 1510; 49 USC 1522; 49 USC 2121 to 2125; 
49 USC 106(g)


CFR Citation:


 14 CFR 121; 14 CFR 125; 14 CFR 129; 14 CFR 135


Legal Deadline:


None


Abstract:


This project would ensure that airplanes used or not used in common 
carriage in air transportation have a comprehensive corrosion 
prevention program within their maintenance or inspection program. In 
April 1988, a commercial transport airplane experienced an in-flight 
decompression and separation of approximately 18 feet of the fuselage 
skin and structure at the top of the airplane. The airplane had been in 
service for 19 years and had flown almost 90,000 flights. The National 
Transportation Safety Board concluded that the failure of the airline 
to detect skin disbonding resulted in corrosion and metal fatigue 
leading to separation of the airplane's skin structure. This rulemaking 
is considered significant because of substantial public interest.


Statement of Need:





The FAA plans to promulgate a rule that would require persons operating 
certain airplanes in air transportation to include in their maintenance 
or inspection program an FAA-approved corrosion prevention and control 
program. This action is necessary to preclude an unsafe condition in 
airplanes due to the effects of corrosion.


Summary of the Legal Basis:





Federal Aviation Act of 1958 (P.L. 95-504, October 24, 1978; P.L. 96-
192, February 15, 1980)


Alternatives:





The FAA may rely upon airplane operators to develop comprehensive 
corrosion prevention and control programs as part of their normal 
maintenance programs or the FAA may rely upon the aviation community to 
develop comprehensive corrosion prevention and control programs for 
individual airplane models and recommend rulemaking to implement them 
in the fleet.


Anticipated Costs and Benefits:





The FAA has implemented corrosion prevention and control programs for 
eleven models of airplane as part of the aging airplane program. The 
cost of these programs range from $3,000 to $30,000 per year depending 
upon the construction of the airplane model. The expected benefit of 
the proposed rule is a reduction in the risk of accidents related to 
corrosion that might otherwise occur. The FAA holds that the potential 
benefits of this proposed rule exceed the expected costs.


Risks:





The U.S. fleet continues to age and recent accident history may not be 
representative of future conditions or of future exposure to such 
conditions. The FAA cannot assess the exact proportion or severity of 
potential accidents that would be averted by issuance of this proposed 
rule. It is the FAA's position that the requirements for operators to 
develop and implement corrosion prevention and control programs would 
result in more consistent conduct of necessary maintenance and in an 
associated increase in overall safety.


Timetable:
_______________________________________________________________________
Action                                 DFR Cite

_______________________________________________________________________
NPRM                                                           09/00/95
Small Entities Affected:


None


Government Levels Affected:


None


Analysis:


 Regulatory Evaluation 09/00/95


Additional Information:


Project Number: AFS-93-382R


Agency Contact:
Frederick Sobeck
Aircraft Maintenance Division
Flight Standards Service
Department of Transportation
Federal Aviation Administration
800 Independence Avenue SW.
Washington, DC 20591
202 267-7355
RIN: 2120-AE92
_______________________________________________________________________
DOT--FAA
            ___________________________________________________________
FINAL RULE STAGE
            ___________________________________________________________
123. +AIRCRAFT FLIGHT SIMULATOR USE IN PILOT TRAINING, TESTING, AND 
CHECKING AND AT TRAINING CENTERS
Legal Authority:


 49 USC 1301; 49 USC 1303; 49 USC 1344; 49 USC 1348; 49 USC 1352; 49 
USC 1355; 49 USC 1401; 49 USC 1421 to 1431; 49 USC 1471; 49 USC 1472; 
49 USC 1502; 49 USC 1510; 49 USC 1522; 49 USC 2121 to 2125; 49 USC 
106(g)


CFR Citation:


 14 CFR 61; 14 CFR 91; 14 CFR 121; 14 CFR 125; 14 CFR 135; 14 CFR 141; 
14 CFR 142


Legal Deadline:


None


Abstract:


This action would amend the pilot and flight instructor certification 
rules to include additional use of aircraft, aircraft flight 
simulators, and flight training devices for pilot training, testing, 
and checking. This notice also would propose a new part 142 that would 
govern a new concept called training centers. This new concept will 
emphasize the use of flight simulators in training applicants for pilot 
certificates. This rulemaking is considered significant because of 
substantial public interest; it involves a major change in the way 
industry trains applicants.


Statement of Need:





The training roles of several elements of the aviation community have 
expanded during the past 10 years. In October 1989, an advisory 
committee studying matters relating to training and qualification 
recommended that the FAA standardize the use of flight simulators and 
flight training devices, provide a means to certificate entities called 
training centers, and permit the training centers to apply for national 
approval of core curriculums that could be used by individuals 
receiving training. This rulemaking project responds to this 
recommendation by including the concept of a certificated training 
center.


Summary of the Legal Basis:





Secs. 601 and 602 of the Federal Aviation Act: Section 601 empowers the 
Administrator to prescribe the minimum standards governing appliances 
such as simulators; section 602 empowers the Administrator to issue 
airmen certificates.


Alternatives:





Since the FAA accepted the recommendations of the advisory committee, 
it will not pursue any nonregulatory options.


Anticipated Costs and Benefits:





The total 10-year cost to implement part 142 is estimated to be about 
$1.3 million discounted. The benefits of this rule, however, far 
outweigh its costs. Most of the cost savings come from lowered 
operations costs. The estimated savings from existing simulator 
training centers training pilots will be $808 million, discounted over 
the next 10 years.


Risks:





Flight simulators will expand under the changes in the simulator rule. 

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