Home > 1994 Unified Agenda > ua14no94 DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (TREAS)...

ua14no94 DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (TREAS)...


Google
 
Web GovRecords.org

The future use of simulators should reduce the need for pilot 
instructional flights and the incidence of instructional flight 
accidents. Each year many student pilots and their instructors die in 
instructional flight accidents. In the 10-year period 1983 through 
1993, the National Transportation Safety Board reported 307 fatal 
instructional accidents resulting in 553 fatalities. The FAA estimates 
the average value of such an accident equals $4.8 million. 
Instructional flight accidents are a risk that would follow in the 
absence of the simulator rule.


Timetable:
_______________________________________________________________________
Action                                 DFR Cite

_______________________________________________________________________
NPRM            57 FR 35888                                    08/11/92
NPRM Comment Period End                                        12/09/92
SNPRM; Comment P58 FR 951403/22/93                             02/19/93
Final Action                                                   01/00/95
Small Entities Affected:


None


Government Levels Affected:


None


Analysis:


 Regulatory Evaluation 08/11/92 (57 FR 35888)


Additional Information:


This project was formerly entitled ``Aircraft Simulator Use in Airman 
Training and Certification.'' Project Number AFS-83-105R.


The SNPRM clarified or eliminated certain provisions found to be 
unclear or inappropriate for present consideration.


Agency Contact:
Warren Robbins
Manager, Regulations Branch
Office of Flight Standards
Department of Transportation
Federal Aviation Administration
800 Independence Avenue SW.
Washington, DC 20591
202 267-8150
RIN: 2120-AA83
_______________________________________________________________________
DOT--FAA
124. +UNESCORTED ACCESS PRIVILEGE
Legal Authority:


 49 USC 1354(a); 49 USC 1356; 49 USC 1357; 49 USC 1358 to 1421; 49 USC 
106(g)


CFR Citation:


 14 CFR 107; 14 CFR 108


Legal Deadline:


 Final, Statutory, April 24, 1992.


Aviation Security Improvement Act of 1990


Abstract:


This action proposed to establish regulations to implement criminal 
history records checks for air carrier and airport security employees. 
This rulemaking is considered significant because of substantial 
congressional and public interest.


Statement of Need:





In response to the December 21, 1988, destruction of Pan American 
Airways Flight 103, former President Bush established a Commission on 
Aviation Security and Terrorism to assess the overall effectiveness of 
the U.S. civil aviation security system. The Commission's May 15, 1990, 
report recommended that Congress enact legislation requiring a criminal 
history records check for airport employees, identify certain crimes 
that indicate a potential risk, and enable airport operators to deny 
employment in positions requiring access to security-sensitive areas. 
The Commission's recommendations formed the basis of the Aviation 
Security Improvement Act of 1990.


Summary of the Legal Basis:





Aviation Security Improvement Act of 1990, Pub. L. 101-604. Section 
105(a) amends section 316 of the Federal Aviation Act of 1958 by adding 
a new subsection (g) captioned ``Air Carrier and Airport Security 
Personnel.''


Alternatives:





Because of the statutory mandate, the FAA does not have a nonregulatory 
option. However, in response to commenters who objected to imposing a 
background check on all individuals having access to the security 
identification display area (SIDA), the FAA issued a supplemental 
notice of proposed rulemaking (Notice 92-3C) that excluded individuals 
with existing unescorted access privileges. The final rule will not 
subject current employees with unescorted access authority to the 
access investigation.


Anticipated Costs and Benefits:





Discounted costs over 10 years are expected to range from $4.3 million 
to $11.1 million. The FAA finds that air terrorist acts are exceedingly 
expensive; an act such as the destruction of Pan American Airways 
Flight 103 could exceed $1.3 billion.


Risks:





The FAA finds that this rulemaking will accomplish an appropriate 
balance between enhancing the effectiveness of the U.S. civil aviation 
security system and respecting the employment rights of individuals.


Timetable:
_______________________________________________________________________
Action                                 DFR Cite

_______________________________________________________________________
NPRM            57 FR 5352                                     02/13/92
NPRM Comment Per57 FR 8834ed to 05/15/92                       03/12/92
NPRM Comment Period End                                        03/16/92
Public Meetings 57 FR 12396                                    04/09/92
SNPRM; Comment P57 FR 432942/17/92                             09/18/92
Final Action                                                   12/00/94
Small Entities Affected:


None


Government Levels Affected:


None


Analysis:


Regulatory Flexibility Analysis; Regulatory Evaluation 09/18/92 (57 FR 
43294)


Additional Information:


Project Number ACS-91-076R.


Agency Contact:
Sam Brinkley
Office of Civil Aviation Security
Department of Transportation
Federal Aviation Administration
800 Independence Avenue SW.
Washington, DC 20591
202 267-9834
RIN: 2120-AE14
_______________________________________________________________________
DOT--FAA
125. +AGING AIRCRAFT SAFETY
Legal Authority:


 49 USC 1301; 49 USC 1303; 49 USC 1344; 49 USC 1348; 49 USC 1352 to 
1355; 49 USC 1401; 49 USC 1421 to 1431; 49 USC 1471; 49 USC 1472; 49 
USC 1501; 49 USC 1510; 49 USC 1522; 49 USC 2121 to 2125; 49 USC 106(g); 
EO 11514


CFR Citation:


 14 CFR 39; 14 CFR 91; 14 CFR 121; 14 CFR 125; 14 CFR 129; 14 CFR 135


Legal Deadline:


 Other, Statutory, April 24, 1992.


Aging Aircraft Safety Act of 1991; action must be initiated by 04/24/
92.


Abstract:


This action would require air carriers of certain aircraft used in air 
transportation to demonstrate that the aircraft's maintenance has been 
adequate to ensure the highest degree of safety. This action would 
require air carriers of 15-year-old or older aircraft with a maximum 
certificated takeoff weight of 75,000 pounds or more to demonstrate 
that certain specified maintenance actions have been performed and to 
make the aircraft available to the Administrator of the FAA for 
inspection. This rulemaking is considered significant because of 
substantial public and congressional interest.


Statement of Need:





The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) plans to require operators of 
15-year-old or older aircraft, used in air transportation, to verify 
that all aging aircraft requirements have been met at each heavy 
maintenance check. The FAA has also proposed a framework for 
operational limits for aircraft, should such limits be necessary in the 
future. It has been recognized for many years that as aircraft get 
older they require increased attention and maintenance. However, the 
Aloha Airlines accident of April 28, 1988, which involved a structural 
failure on a relatively old and heavily used aircraft, shocked the 
Federal Aviation Administration, the aviation industry, and the 
traveling public. The accident challenged the soundness of a number of 
assumptions that had guided regulatory policy on aircraft age, 
structures, inspections, and maintenance. Subsequent to this accident, 
the Congress directed the FAA to initiate a rulemaking proceeding for 
the purpose of issuing a rule to assure the continuing airworthiness of 
aging aircraft.


Summary of the Legal Basis:





Aging Aircraft Safety Act of 1991, Public Law 102-143, Oct. 28, 1991 
Title IV.


Alternatives:





Because of the statutory mandate, the FAA does not have a nonregulatory 
option.


Anticipated Costs and Benefits:





The only direct costs of the proposed rule would result from the 

Pages: << Prev 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Next >>

Other Popular 1994 Unified Agenda Documents:

1 ua14no94 FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION SERVICE...
2 ua25ap94 4527. SMALL BUSINESS SIZE STANDARDS; FIXED SIZE STANDARD LEVELS...
3 ua25ap94 4294. INTERPRETATION, EXEMPTIONS, AND WAIVER GUIDANCE CONCERNING 18 USC...
4 ua14no94 OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET...
5 ua25ap94 3614. CONTINUOUS COHABITATION...
6 ua25ap94 National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities...
7 ua25ap94 Federal Energy Regulatory Commission...
8 ua25ap94 4443. REPORTING PLAN FUNDING INFORMATION...
9 ua25ap94 Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board...
10 ua25ap94 4261. IMPLEMENTATION OF JOHN F. KENNEDY ASSASSINATION RECORDS COLLECTION...
11 ua14no94 NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION...
12 ua25ap94 3170. ESCROW FUNDS AND OTHER SIMILAR FUNDS...
13 ua14no94 INDEX TO ENTRIES THAT MAY AFFECT GOVERNMENT LEVELS...
14 ua14no94 OFFICE OF FEDERAL HOUSING ENTERPRISE OVERSIGHT...
15 ua14no94 RESOLUTION TRUST CORPORATION...
16 ua14no94 NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION (NARA)...
17 ua14no94 REGULATORY INFORMATION SERVICE CENTER...
18 ua25ap94 4862. REGULATORY REVIEW...
19 ua14no94 Bureau of Reclamation (RB)...
20 ua25ap94 Small Business Administration...
21 ua25ap94 Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation...
22 ua14no94 Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS)...
23 ua14no94 SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (SBA)...
24 ua14no94 DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (DOJ)...
25 ua25ap94 2207. CIVIL PENALTIES UNDER ERISA SECTION 502(L)...
26 ua25ap94 2140. OFFICE OF JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION FORMULA...
27 ua14no94 FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD...
28 ua25ap94 868. SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS, AND ENGINEERING (SME) EDUCATION...
29 ua14no94 COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS...
30 ua14no94 Departmental and Others (ENDEP)...


Other Documents:

1994 Unified Agenda Records and Documents

GovRecords.org presents information on various agencies of the United States Government. Even though all information is believed to be credible and accurate, no guarantees are made on the complete accuracy of our government records archive. Care should be taken to verify the information presented by responsible parties. Please see our reference page for congressional, presidential, and judicial branch contact information. GovRecords.org values visitor privacy. Please see the privacy page for more information.
House Rules:

104th House Rules
105th House Rules
106th House Rules

Congressional Bills:

104th Congressional Bills
105th Congressional Bills
106th Congressional Bills
107th Congressional Bills
108th Congressional Bills

Supreme Court Decisions

Supreme Court Decisions

Additional

1995 Privacy Act Documents
1997 Privacy Act Documents
1994 Unified Agenda
2004 Unified Agenda

Congressional Documents:

104th Congressional Documents
105th Congressional Documents
106th Congressional Documents
107th Congressional Documents
108th Congressional Documents

Congressional Directory:

105th Congressional Directory
106th Congressional Directory
107th Congressional Directory
108th Congressional Directory

Public Laws:

104th Congressional Public Laws
105th Congressional Public Laws
106th Congressional Public Laws
107th Congressional Public Laws
108th Congressional Public Laws

Presidential Records

1994 Presidential Documents
1995 Presidential Documents
1996 Presidential Documents
1997 Presidential Documents
1998 Presidential Documents
1999 Presidential Documents
2000 Presidential Documents
2001 Presidential Documents
2002 Presidential Documents
2003 Presidential Documents
2004 Presidential Documents

Home Executive Judicial Legislative Additional Reference About Privacy